Disabled Navy veteran James Jones, 66, gets a push from his grandson, Jaylen Thomas, as the rain begins to fall outside Jones’ home in Balch Springs, Texas, Wednesday, May 3, 2017. Jones lives on the corner near where teenager Jordan Edwards was killed by police. As the family of the black teenager slain by a white police officer calls for an indictment and more investigation, the Dallas suburb where he died faces some of the same issues with race as Ferguson, Cleveland, and other cities that have experienced high-profile police shootings of African-Americans. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Family want officer who shot black teen charged with crime

Balch Springs police officer Roy Oliver Tuesday

BALCH SPRINGS, Texas — The family of the black teenager shot and killed by a white police officer while riding in a vehicle leaving a party wants criminal charges filed against the officer, who was fired for violating department policies during the shooting.

Balch Springs police officer Roy Oliver was fired Tuesday, three days after 15-year-old Jordan Edwards’ death.

Edwards, a high school freshman, was leaving the party with his two brothers and two other teenagers Saturday night. Police arrived at the scene to investigate an underage drinking complaint and spotted the vehicle leaving. Oliver opened fire as the teenagers were driving away.

Shots from his rifle pierced the front side passenger window, hitting Edwards in the front seat, according to Edwards’ family attorneys, Lee Merritt and Jasmine Crockett. His 16-year-old brother was driving.

The Dallas County district attorney, which has a unit dedicated to investigating police shootings, and the Dallas County sheriff’s office are investigating the case. The medical examiner has ruled Edwards’ death a homicide.

Oliver is white, according to the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement. Police chief Jonathan Haber, speaking to reporters Tuesday night, wouldn’t describe what he believed Oliver did wrong because the officer can appeal his termination. He previously said police video of what happened Saturday night contradicted his department’s original statement and raised questions about whether officers had acted correctly.

Thousands of Facebook and Twitter users have posted about the case in recent days with the hashtag “#jordanedwards,” some comparing his death to other police shootings of young black men, such as 12-year-old Tamir Rice in Cleveland, who was fatally shot in November 2014 as he held a pellet gun.

Their call followed news Tuesday of the Justice Department’s decision to not charge two white police officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in the shooting death of a black man in 2016, and as a white officer in North Charleston, South Carolina, pleaded guilty to murder in the fatal shooting of a 50-year-old black man in 2015.

Fatal police shootings of African-Americans have prompted criticism from victims’ families over delayed action, and in some cases mass protests. But Crockett credited Haber for moving quickly to correct the police department’s mistaken statement and fire the officer the department said was responsible.

“After you’ve seen the scenario play out over and over, you’re always building up this hope, and it seems like you’re cut off right before you get to the promised land,” Crockett said.

Crockett said Tuesday that she was optimistic that Oliver would eventually be indicted.

A family statement released Tuesday night called for disciplinary action against other officers who “extended this nightmare for those children.”

“Our family is working hard to deal with both the loss of our beloved Jordan and the lingering trauma it has caused our boys,” the family statement said.

Cindy Stormer, an attorney for Oliver, issued a statement saying the shooting was “recent and still being investigated.”

“Everyone should wait until the facts come out and we know more,” she said, according to the Dallas Morning News.

Police originally said the teenagers’ vehicle was reversing “in an aggressive manner” toward officers, but Haber said Monday that video taken at the scene proved the vehicle was actually driving away.

The police department’s latest statement, released Tuesday night, says officers entering the house heard gunshots ring out during a “chaotic scene with numerous people running away from the location.”

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