Apple shares recover sharply

ive and a half months ago, word that Steve Jobs would only work part-time as he recovered from a liver transplant would have sent investors into a selling frenzy, so closely linked was Apple’s charismatic co-founder and CEO to the company’s success.

The prospect of Apple CEO Steve Jobs returning only part-time to Apple following his liver transplant is much less daunting to investors than when Jobs began his medical leave five months ago.

SEATTLE — Five and a half months ago, word that Steve Jobs would only work part-time as he recovered from a liver transplant would have sent investors into a selling frenzy, so closely linked was Apple’s charismatic co-founder and CEO to the company’s success.

But now, with Jobs’ return to Apple just days away that prospect is a lot less daunting.

Wall Street has grappled with the implications of Jobs’ illness since August 2004, when investors learned the CEO had kept a cancer diagnosis secret until after he underwent surgery.

Investors feared a half-year absence would leave one of the oldest computer makers adrift, because Jobs had become the essence of the company he started in 1975.

But in the last few months, the company released must-have gadgets and software improvements with nary a public hiccup.

Its shares have almost doubled, raising the question of how central Jobs is to Apple today?

The company’s past silence on matters of Jobs’ health made shareholders jittery when Jobs appeared increasingly, even alarmingly, thin last year.

Easily spooked, investors sent the stock tumbling five per cent to its lowest point in a year on a rumour last October that Jobs had suffered a heart attack.

Then shares slipped two per cent in December when Apple said that Jobs would not speak as usual the next month at the annual Macworld conference, then bounced up four per cent on Jan. 5 when Jobs explained his weight loss as a treatable hormone imbalance.

They sank seven per cent a week later after Apple said he would be taking six months off because his medical problems were more complex than he initially thought.

Since then, Wall Street’s whiplash has had time to heal, especially because Apple’s stock has weathered the recession better than those of most of its competitors.

Shares have improved 76 per cent since the dark day in January when Jobs announced his leave, closing Friday at $139.48.

It is not yet clear how investors will take the latest word, that Jobs had a liver transplant two months ago in Tennessee, according to The Wall Street Journal, and that he will likely work part-time, at least at first.

Apple has not confirmed the report, and has said only that Jobs is looking forward to returning to Apple at the end of the month. Spokesman Steve Dowling had no further comment Sunday.

Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple put its chief operating officer at the helm during Jobs’ absence.

Tim Cook had been tested in the role during Jobs’ first bout with cancer and shared the stage with the CEO during key product announcements last fall.

He brimmed with confidence in the early days of Jobs’ medical leave, assuring analysts that the show would go on even without its frontman.

“The values of our company are extremely well entrenched,” Cook said in the company’s fiscal first-quarter earnings call in January.

“We believe that we’re on the face of the Earth to make great products, and that’s not changing.”

Indeed, Apple has produced in the last six months: updated laptops with lower entry-level prices, updated Mac software and a faster iPhone with many requested features.

Apple’s cult-like followers remain avid, some camping overnight at Apple stores last week to be one of the first to snatch up the new iPhone 3G S, despite a pre-order option offered for the first time by Apple and wireless carriers.

Tim Bajarin, an analyst for Creative Strategies who has been following Apple for more than 25 years, said things ran smoothly in Jobs’ absence because he had already relinquished much of his control over the company.

“Jobs hasn’t been running day to day operations for almost two years, well before he got sick,” Bajarin said.

Cook was de facto in charge, and the people in charge of each of Apple’s gadgets and programs were, for the most part, working without a net.

“They only went to Jobs on big issues and questions and making sure their programs where in line with Jobs’ overall vision,” he said, which the CEO scopes out in 10-year increments.

While Jobs has taken much of the credit for Apple’s turnaround in the last decade, Cook has played an import role behind the scenes, says Roger Kay, an industry analyst and president of Endpoint Technologies Associates.

Just Posted

Men posing as repo men attempt to steal vehicle in Red Deer County

Two men attempted to steal a utility vehicle from a Red Deer… Continue reading

Red Deerian spreads kindness with one card at a time

One Red Deerian wants to combat bullying by spreading kindness in the… Continue reading

Bowden baby in need of surgery

“Help for Alexis” Go Fund Me account

PHOTO: First Rider bus safety in Red Deer

Central Alberta students learned bus safety in the Notre Dame High School… Continue reading

WATCH: Annual Family Picnic at Central Spray and Play

Blue Grass Sod Farms Ltd. held the Annual Family Picnic at the… Continue reading

Woman has finger ripped off at West Edmonton Mall waterslide

SASKATOON — A Saskatchewan woman says she lost a finger after her… Continue reading

Uncertainty looms over Canada’s cannabis tourism, but ambitions are high

TORONTO — Longtime marijuana advocate Neev Tapiero is ready for the cannabis-driven… Continue reading

Feds mulling safeguards to prevent ‘surge’ of cheap steel imports into Canada

OTTAWA — The federal government extended an olive branch of sorts to… Continue reading

Ontario govt caps off summer session by passing bill to cut Toronto council size

TORONTO — The Ontario government passed a controversial bill to slash the… Continue reading

Updated:Italian bridge collapse sends cars plunging, killing 26

MILAN — A 51-year-old highway bridge in the Italian port city of… Continue reading

Saudi Arabia spat affecting Canadians embarking on hajj, community members say

TORONTO — Members of Canada’s Muslim community say recent tensions between Ottawa… Continue reading

Tug carrying up to 22,000 litres of fuel capsizes in Fraser River off Vancouver

VANCOUVER — The smell of diesel filled the air as crews worked… Continue reading

Nebraska executes first inmate using fentanyl

LINCOLN, Neb. — Nebraska carried out its first execution in more than… Continue reading

Most Read


Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $185 for 260 issues (must live in delivery area to qualify) Unlimited Digital Access 99 cents for the first four weeks and then only $15 per month Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $15 a month