Apple shares recover sharply

ive and a half months ago, word that Steve Jobs would only work part-time as he recovered from a liver transplant would have sent investors into a selling frenzy, so closely linked was Apple’s charismatic co-founder and CEO to the company’s success.

The prospect of Apple CEO Steve Jobs returning only part-time to Apple following his liver transplant is much less daunting to investors than when Jobs began his medical leave five months ago.

SEATTLE — Five and a half months ago, word that Steve Jobs would only work part-time as he recovered from a liver transplant would have sent investors into a selling frenzy, so closely linked was Apple’s charismatic co-founder and CEO to the company’s success.

But now, with Jobs’ return to Apple just days away that prospect is a lot less daunting.

Wall Street has grappled with the implications of Jobs’ illness since August 2004, when investors learned the CEO had kept a cancer diagnosis secret until after he underwent surgery.

Investors feared a half-year absence would leave one of the oldest computer makers adrift, because Jobs had become the essence of the company he started in 1975.

But in the last few months, the company released must-have gadgets and software improvements with nary a public hiccup.

Its shares have almost doubled, raising the question of how central Jobs is to Apple today?

The company’s past silence on matters of Jobs’ health made shareholders jittery when Jobs appeared increasingly, even alarmingly, thin last year.

Easily spooked, investors sent the stock tumbling five per cent to its lowest point in a year on a rumour last October that Jobs had suffered a heart attack.

Then shares slipped two per cent in December when Apple said that Jobs would not speak as usual the next month at the annual Macworld conference, then bounced up four per cent on Jan. 5 when Jobs explained his weight loss as a treatable hormone imbalance.

They sank seven per cent a week later after Apple said he would be taking six months off because his medical problems were more complex than he initially thought.

Since then, Wall Street’s whiplash has had time to heal, especially because Apple’s stock has weathered the recession better than those of most of its competitors.

Shares have improved 76 per cent since the dark day in January when Jobs announced his leave, closing Friday at $139.48.

It is not yet clear how investors will take the latest word, that Jobs had a liver transplant two months ago in Tennessee, according to The Wall Street Journal, and that he will likely work part-time, at least at first.

Apple has not confirmed the report, and has said only that Jobs is looking forward to returning to Apple at the end of the month. Spokesman Steve Dowling had no further comment Sunday.

Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple put its chief operating officer at the helm during Jobs’ absence.

Tim Cook had been tested in the role during Jobs’ first bout with cancer and shared the stage with the CEO during key product announcements last fall.

He brimmed with confidence in the early days of Jobs’ medical leave, assuring analysts that the show would go on even without its frontman.

“The values of our company are extremely well entrenched,” Cook said in the company’s fiscal first-quarter earnings call in January.

“We believe that we’re on the face of the Earth to make great products, and that’s not changing.”

Indeed, Apple has produced in the last six months: updated laptops with lower entry-level prices, updated Mac software and a faster iPhone with many requested features.

Apple’s cult-like followers remain avid, some camping overnight at Apple stores last week to be one of the first to snatch up the new iPhone 3G S, despite a pre-order option offered for the first time by Apple and wireless carriers.

Tim Bajarin, an analyst for Creative Strategies who has been following Apple for more than 25 years, said things ran smoothly in Jobs’ absence because he had already relinquished much of his control over the company.

“Jobs hasn’t been running day to day operations for almost two years, well before he got sick,” Bajarin said.

Cook was de facto in charge, and the people in charge of each of Apple’s gadgets and programs were, for the most part, working without a net.

“They only went to Jobs on big issues and questions and making sure their programs where in line with Jobs’ overall vision,” he said, which the CEO scopes out in 10-year increments.

While Jobs has taken much of the credit for Apple’s turnaround in the last decade, Cook has played an import role behind the scenes, says Roger Kay, an industry analyst and president of Endpoint Technologies Associates.

Just Posted

One strong wind leaves years of replanting work for Red Deer parks staff

High visibility boulevards already replanted, neighbourhood work starts next year

Red Deerians await local cannabis stores

So far 31 stores in Alberta awarded licence to operate

Rimbey RCMP seek missing man with health concerns

Has anyone seen Bill Harris of Ponka County?

Central Alberta born jaguar dies

Mia was the first jaguar in the world to receive stem cell treatment

Updated: Two men facing kidnapping charges in connection with abduction

48-year-old woman was allegedly abducted in Red Deer on Oct. 17

WATCH: Make-A-Wish grants Star Wars loving teen’s wish

The Make-A-Wish Foundation granted Anakin Suerink’s wish in Red Deer Saturday afternoon

Local Sports: Rudy Soffo valuable to Kings on the court

When Rudy Soffo first saw the RDC basketball Kings roster he was… Continue reading

Except for 1 kick, Saints, Ravens are evenly matched

BALTIMORE — In a matchup between the league’s highest-scoring offence and top-ranked… Continue reading

Julia Louis-Dreyfus gets a top award for comedy

WASHINGTON — After a 35-year acting career and with two iconic television… Continue reading

Ricky Skaggs, Dottie West enter Country Music Hall of Fame

NASHVILLE — Bluegrass and country star Ricky Skaggs, singer Dottie West and… Continue reading

AP Exclusive: Stephen Hawking’s wheelchair, thesis for sale

LONDON — Stephen Hawking was a cosmic visionary, a figure of inspiration… Continue reading

Canada deemed U.S. a safe country for asylum seekers after internal review

OTTAWA — Canadian immigration officials have determined that the United States remains… Continue reading

Bombardier sues Mitsubishi over alleged theft of aircraft trade secrets

MONTREAL — Bombardier is suing Mitsubishi Aircraft in the United States over… Continue reading

Three strong earthquakes reported in Pacific Ocean off Vancouver Island

Three relatively strong earthquakes were recorded Sunday night in the Pacific Ocean… Continue reading

Most Read