FILE - In this April 7, 2018 file photo, Cedar George-Parker addresses the crowd where protesters opposed to the Kinder Morgan Inc. Trans Mountain pipeline extension project defy a court order and block an entrance to the company’s property in Burnaby, Canada. Some fear an expanded pipeline will bring greater damage than that caused by a 2007 pipeline rupture in Burnaby when an excavator hit the pipeline, spewing crude oil, which coated nearby homes and seeped into the harbor. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP, File)

‘Betrayed’ Canadians could launch unprecedented protests over pipeline: activist

VANCOUVER — Outrage over the federal government’s announcement about buying the Trans Mountain pipeline to ensure it gets built could fuel unprecedented protests, says a prominent environmentalist who was at the forefront of British Columbia’s so-called War in the Woods in the 1990s.

Tzeporah Berman said the fight against the pipeline expansion is even bigger than those over logging in Clayoquot Sound.

Canadians are angry the government is shelling out $4.5 billion to purchase the Trans Mountain pipeline rather than investing in clean energy after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s climate-change promises during the 2015 election and his later commitment to the Paris climate accord, she said.

“My experience is that people are motivated by betrayal, they’re motivated by a lack of fairness, they’re motivated by a sense of shared common purpose and outrage. In this case we have all of that,” said Berman, who was cleared of aiding and abetting protesters at the Clayoquot blockade and is now an adjunct professor of environmental studies at York University in Toronto.

Berman said the Liberal government “made a very big mistake” by backing Kinder Morgan’s project and alienating voters to create “a perfect storm” that would prompt people to take action.

“I think a lot of us who knocked on doors for the Trudeau government really believed them when they said they were going to bring evidence-based analysis and science and democratic process back to pipeline reviews.”

Berman is a director of Stand.earth, one of the groups that organized an anti-pipeline protest in Vancouver on Tuesday after Finance Minister Bill Morneau announced the government’s plans for the pipeline between Edmonton and Burnaby, B.C. Another protest is planned in Victoria on Thursday.

“My expectation is that the outrage is going to grow and we’re not just going it see it here in British Columbia but we’re going to see it nationally and internationally,” she said, adding social media makes it possible for activists to connect in ways that didn’t exist at the height of anti-logging protests in 1993.

“We didn’t have email, we didn’t have cellphones. It was a remote location that took most people five to seven hours to get through. This is a pipeline project that runs through urban centres,” she said of Trans Mountain.

Khelsilem, a Squamish Nation council member who goes by his first name, said the federal government’s decision to pursue completion of the pipeline expansion threatens Indigenous communities if there was a spill of bitumen from increased tanker traffic in B.C. waters.

“Trudeau had promised during the election that he would create a new environmental process that would protect Indigenous rights and that the Kinder Morgan project would be included and sent back to be done through the new process, and on both those counts he’s failed completely,” he said.

Along with multiple legal challenges involving the pipeline, the Squamish Nation and five other First Nations are involved in a Federal Court of Appeal case that targets Ottawa’s approval of the project.

“The protesters and the opposition, and the civil disobedience is probably going to increase,” Khelsilem said.

“Our mandate from our people is to continue to defend our rights as a people and to protect our territory, not just for us but for future generations. We’re going to continue to stand with our allies that support our Indigenous rights and change the story of Canada, that Canada is no longer a country that disregards Indigenous rights.”

Just Posted

Alberta government staff to take day course on Indigenous history, culture

EDMONTON — A three-year program to help government staff better understand Indigenous… Continue reading

Study says exercise can foster brain health for kids with autism and ADHD

TORONTO — A new report says kids with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity… Continue reading

US could back 1st pot-derived medicine, and some are worried

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — A British pharmaceutical company is getting closer to… Continue reading

Competition heating up for price-sensitive passengers as Swoop set to launch

MONTREAL — Competition is heating up for Canada’s most price-sensitive travellers as… Continue reading

Not too close with Trudeau, Bellegarde insists as AFN race gets underway

OTTAWA — Experience usually helps when it comes to getting a job… Continue reading

WATCH: Central Alberta High School Soccer League champs crowned

Lindsay Thurber girls’ team and Notre Dame boys’ team won Saturday at Edgar Park Field in Red Deer

Smoking hits new low; about 14 per cent of US adults light up

NEW YORK — Smoking in the U.S. has hit another all-time low.… Continue reading

On a big night for ‘Panther,’ Boseman honours real-life hero

SANTA MONICA, Calif. — The MTV Movie & TV Awards gave “Black… Continue reading

Geraldine McCaughrean wins Carnegie children’s book prize

LONDON — British writer Geraldine McCaughrean on Monday won the prestigious Carnegie… Continue reading

Tears flow as gay military veterans tell judge about ruined careers, lives

OTTAWA — Gay military veterans are telling a federal judge they were… Continue reading

Shotgun wounds show homeowner shot Indigenous man at close range, court told

HAMILTON — Either one of two shotgun blasts that hit an Indigenous… Continue reading

When it comes to tipping for service, millennials are cheapest

U.S. millennials are quick to whip out their wallets for pricey avocado… Continue reading

Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

GENEVA — Obsessive video gamers know how to anticipate dangers in virtual… Continue reading

Most Read


Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $185 for 260 issues (must live in delivery area to qualify) Unlimited Digital Access 99 cents for the first four weeks and then only $15 per month Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $15 a month