Boxing Day sales madness rages

Shoppers were out in force across much of Canada today trying to snap up deals in the annual Boxing Day sales.

Shoppers were out in force across much of Canada today trying to snap up deals in the annual Boxing Day sales.

In southern Ontario it’s unclear how last weekend’s ice storm has affected sales, but the manager of one of Toronto’s biggest shopping malls says weather problems haven’t kept people away.

Yorkdale general manager Anthony Casalanguida says you’d never know there were weather problems based on the number of shoppers in the mall.

He says since Monday many people without power have been using Yorkdale as a warming centre while others with no power at home came to the mall to recharge cell phones and laptops.

Casalanguida says it’s hard to tell what the bottom line for retailers is since most won’t have final sales figures available until next month.

But he says the mall is on track for a five per cent increase in shoppers this Boxing Day compared to last year.

It was a similar story at Toronto’s downtown Eaton Centre, where many of the thousands of bargain hunters were trudging through the mall wearing heavy winter coats.

Americans waited until the last minute to buy holiday gifts, but retailers weren’t prepared for the spike.

Heavy spending in the final days of the mostly lacklustre season sent sales up 3.5 per cent between Nov. 1 and Tuesday, according to MasterCard Advisors SpendingPulse, which tracks payments but doesn’t give dollar figures.

Online shopping led the uptick, with spending up 10 per cent to $38. 91 billion between Nov. 2 and Sunday, research firm comScore said.

“We always have last-minute Charlies, but this year even people who normally complete shopping earlier completed shopping later,” said Marshal Cohen, chief retail analyst at market research firm NPD Group.

The late surge caught companies off guard. UPS and FedEx failed to deliver some packages by Christmas due to a combination of poor weather and overloaded systems, leaving some unhappy holiday shoppers.

Justin Londagin and his wife ordered their 7-year-old son a jersey of Russell Wilson of the Seattle Seahawks from NFL’s website on Dec. 19. They paid $12.95 extra for two-day shipping to get it to their Augusta, Kan., home before Christmas, but it didn’t arrive in time.

“We had to get creative and wrote him a note from Santa to tell him that the jersey fell out of the sleigh and Santa will get it to him as soon as he could,” he said.

Amazon is offering customers with delayed shipments a refund on their shipping charges and $20 toward a future purchase.

And other retailers such as Macy’s said they are looking into the situation.

The last-minute surge this year solidifies the increasing popularity of online shopping, which accounts for about 10 per cent of sales during the last three months of the year. It also underscores the challenges that companies face delivering on the experience, particularly during the holiday shopping season that runs from the beginning of November through December.

Analysts say FedEx and UPS typically work closely with big retailers to get a sense of the volume of packages they’ll handle during peak times like the holiday season. Extra flights, trucks and seasonal workers can be added if the projections are large.

But this year, David Vernon, a senior research analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein, said weather played a role. The early December ice storms in Dallas could have hurt operations, he said, and packages can start to accumulate. And that got compounded by a late surge in shipments, he said.

“Clearly, as a group, (they) underestimated the demand for Internet retailing during the holidays,” Vernon said.

Another problem was the growing popularity of retailers offering free shipping. Amazon, for one, has a two-day free shipping offer that comes with its $79 annual Prime membership. The company said in the third week of December alone, more than 1 million people signed up for the membership.

“Frankly the right hand wasn’t talking to the left,” said Forrester analyst Sucharita Mulpuru. “The marketing teams of a lot of web retailers (offering free shipping) were not talking to the operations and supply chain teams.”

The resulting delayed shipments could be a problem for shippers. UPS and FedEx did not quantify how many packages were affected but said they were just a small fraction of total holiday deliveries.

“The central pillar of their business is a perception of reliability with their customers,” said Jeremy Robinson-Leon, CEO of Group Gordon, a corporate and crisis PR firm. This year’s snafus “just really erodes trust among customers.”

Still, analysts say people will still shop online. “Consumers tend to have a short memory, especially if you fast forward to another year,” said Andrew Lipsman, vice-president of industry analysis for comScore.

Indeed, some shoppers are taking the delays in stride. Traci Arbios, who lives in Clovis, Calif., did about 90 per cent of her shopping online. Most items included free shipping and everything arrived on time except one package she ordered from a seller on eBay that was sent first class by the U.S. Postal Service on Dec. 12. It still had not arrived on Thursday.

“Everything arrived on time except this one item,” she said. “It’s not going to stop me from shopping online.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Red Deer County has three new confirmed COVID-19 cases

The provincial government has confirmed three new COVID-19 cases in Red Deer… Continue reading

Rimbey textile artists creating hand-made masks

Group has also been helped out by a local business

People ‘can count on’ Alberta RCMP amid COVID-19 pandemic, says deputy commissioner

Albertans “can count on the RCMP every day” during the COVID-19 pandemic,… Continue reading

Central Albertans win big in 2020 STARS Lottery

A few central Albertans won big in the 2020 STARS lottery. Jeff… Continue reading

107 new cases of COVID-19 in Alberta, 5 additional deaths

More than 1,000 cases in Alberta total

WATCH: Red Deer emergency call centre hours change starting next week

Hours at the City of Red Deer’s COVID-19 emergency call centre will… Continue reading

Alberta Health Services provides COVID-19 prevention tips

Alberta Health Services has a number of recommendations for people amid the… Continue reading

Alberta government website has latest COVID-19 statistics

Red Deer Advocate readers can stay up to date on the COVID-19… Continue reading

Taste of home schooling generating new interest among parents

Selena Valencia is on the fence when it comes to home-schooling her… Continue reading

‘The Charter still applies’: Canadians urged to monitor civil liberties during pandemic

Civil rights advocates say citizens need to be vigilant about how authorities are using new powers

Essential workers talk about how COVID-19 affects them

Health-care workers, grocery store staff, transit drivers and food delivery workers are… Continue reading

Sister of woman found dead last month is accused of first-degree murder

/COQUITLAM, B.C. — A first-degree murder charge has been laid against the… Continue reading

Trudeau announces more financial help for country’s most vulnerable

$40 million will go to Women and Gender Equality Canada

Most Read