Canadian building permits rise

The value of building permits in Canada rose 18 per cent in October to $6.1 billion, led by gains in the value of non-residential permits and in construction intentions for single-family dwellings.

The value of building permits in Canada rose 18 per cent in October to $6.1 billion, led by gains in the value of non-residential permits and in construction intentions for single-family dwellings.

The total value of building permits increased in six provinces, led by Alberta and Ontario. Statistics Canada said the value of residential permits climbed 3.8 per cent to $3.4 billion, the third consecutive monthly increase. In the non-residential sector, municipalities issued permits worth $2.7 billion, a 42.4 per cent jump after a 9.2 per cent decline in September.

All three components of non-residential construction permits increased in October. Municipalities issued building permits worth $48.3 billion between January and October, down 20.8 per cent from the same period in 2008.

An increase in the value of building permits for single-family dwellings more than offset a decline in multiple dwelling intentions.

The value of building permits for single-family dwellings increased 10.1 per cent to $2.4 billion.

It was the eighth consecutive monthly increase. Every province except Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island contributed to the growth.

The value of building permits for multi-family dwellings fell 8.2 per cent to $1 billion, after a 34.3 per cent jump in September. British Columbia, Alberta and Nova Scotia had the largest declines, while Ontario posted the biggest gain in construction intentions for multi-family dwellings.