FILE - In this April 18, 2018, file photo, a graphic from Cambridge Analytica’s Twitter page is displayed on a computer screen in New York. A published report said the data firm at the center of Facebook’s privacy debacle is closing its doors. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Data firm at centre of Facebook privacy scandal will close

NEW YORK — Cambridge Analytica, the Trump-affiliated data firm at the centre of Facebook’s worst privacy scandal in history, is declaring bankruptcy and shutting down.

The London firm blamed “unfairly negative media coverage” and said it has been “vilified” for actions it says are both legal and widely accepted as part of online advertising.

Cambridge Analytica said it has filed papers to begin insolvency proceedings in the U.K. and will seek bankruptcy protection in a federal court in New York.

“The siege of media coverage has driven away virtually all of the company’s customers and suppliers,” Cambridge Analytica said in a statement. “As a result, it has been determined that it is no longer viable to continue operating the business.”

Facebook said it will keep looking into data misuse by Cambridge Analytica even though the firm is closing down. And Jeff Chester of the Center for Digital Democracy, a digital advocacy group in Washington, said criticisms of Facebook’s privacy practices won’t go away just because Cambridge Analytica has.

“Cambridge Analytica’s practices, although it crossed ethical boundaries, is really emblematic of how data-driven digital marketing occurs worldwide,” Chester said. “Rather than rejoicing that a bad actor has met its just reward, we should recognize that many more Cambridge Analytica-like companies are operating in the conjoined commercial and political marketplace.”

Cambridge Analytica, whose clients included Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, sought information on Facebook users to build psychological profiles on a large portion of the U.S. electorate.

The company was able to amass the database quickly with the help of an app that purported to be a personality test. The app collected data on tens of millions of people and their Facebook friends, even those who did not download the app themselves.

Canadian firm AggregateIQ Data Services Ltd., which has been linked to Cambridge Analytica but consistently denied any connection, said Wednesday it is business as usual and has no plans of shuttering.

“AggregateIQ is and has always been 100 per cent Canadian owned and operated. AggregateIQ has never been a part of Cambridge Analytica or SCL. We have no plans to close our business,” co-founder Jeff Silverster told The Canadian Press.

But whistleblower Christopher Wylie, claims he helped found AggregateIQ while he worked for SCL, which is the parent company of Cambridge Analytica. Wylie also alleges that Cambridge Analytica used data harvested from more than 50-million Facebook users to help U.S. President Donald Trump win the 2016 election.

Facebook suspended AggregateIQ from its platform last month following reports that the company may be connected to Cambridge Analytica’s parent company, SCL.

The Victoria-based company is under investigation by privacy officials in Ottawa, B.C. and the United Kingdom for its role in influencing the outcome of the U.K.’s Brexit referendum. It is also under investigation for allegedly violating limits on spending during that campaign to benefit the “leave” side.

Facebook estimates the personal information of 622,161 users in Canada — and nearly 87 million worldwide — was improperly accessed by Cambridge Analytica.

Facebook has since tightened its privacy restrictions, and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before Congress for the first time in two days of hearings. Facebook also has suspended other companies for using similar tactics. One is Cubeyou, which makes personality quizzes. That company has said it did nothing wrong and is seeking reinstatement.

Cambridge Analytica suspended CEO Alexander Nix in March pending an investigation after Nix boasted of various unsavoury services to an undercover reporter for Britain’s Channel 4 News. Channel 4 News broadcast clips that showed Nix saying his data-mining firm played a major role in securing Trump’s victory in the 2016 presidential elections.

Acting CEO Alexander Tayler also stepped down in April and returned to his previous post as chief data officer.

Cambridge has denied wrongdoing, and Trump’s campaign has said it didn’t use Cambridge’s data. On Wednesday, Cambridge Analytica said an outside investigation it commissioned concluded the allegations were not “borne out by the facts.”

Facebook’s audit of the firm has been suspended while U.K. regulators conduct their own probe. But Facebook says Cambridge Analytica’s decision to close “doesn’t change our commitment and determination to understand exactly what happened and make sure it doesn’t happen again.”

Cambridge Analytica has said it is committed to helping the U.K. investigation. But the office of U.K. Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said in March that the firm failed to meet a deadline to produce the information requested.

Denham said the prime allegation against Cambridge Analytica is that it acquired personal data in an unauthorized way, adding that the data provisions act requires services like Facebook to have strong safeguards against misuse of data.

Just Posted

Disputed Keystone Pipeline project focus of court hearing

BILLINGS, Mont. — Attorneys for the Trump administration were due in a… Continue reading

Still smoking and still joking, Tommy Chong views life at 80

LOS ANGELES — Yeah man, Tommy Chong says he always knew he’d… Continue reading

CN Rail to acquire 1,000 new grain hopper cars over the next two years

MONTREAL — Canadian National Railway Co. says it plans to acquire 1,000… Continue reading

Trump launches probe into auto imports, possible tariffs

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration on Wednesday launched an investigation into whether… Continue reading

NDP, Tories tied at 37 per cent support, new poll suggests; Liberals trail at 21

TORONTO — The New Democrats have the same 37 per cent voter… Continue reading

Local athletes shine on the track at CASAA Zone Track and Field Championships

Lindsay Thurber Raiders athlete Hayley Lalor was the winner in the senior girls individual aggregate

Ovechkin, Holtsby shine in Game 7, Caps beat Lightning

Capitals 4 Lightning 0 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Alex Ovechkin scored early… Continue reading

B.C.’s Horgan defends fight to both retain and restrict Alberta oil imports

YELLOWKNIFE — B.C. Premier John Horgan says he is fighting to both… Continue reading

Media are not an arm of the police, Vice lawyer tells Supreme Court hearing

OTTAWA — Journalists are not an investigative arm of the police, a… Continue reading

PHOTOS: Red Deer kids learning baseball skills

Red Deer Minor Baseball Rally Cap players practice in Bower Wednesday

Lacombe receives award for contribution to recreation

City received the William Matcalfe Award for major renovations to the Gary Moe Auto Group Sportsplex

‘Knees-together’ judge can practise law again

Former judge Robin Camp allowed to practise law again: Law Society of Alberta

Photo: Roundabout action on 67th Street

Construction season is in full force

Alberta demands all-party support for pipeline at western premiers meeting

Leaders from western Canadian provinces, territories holding a morning meeting today in Yellowknife

Most Read


Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $185 for 260 issues (must live in delivery area to qualify) Unlimited Digital Access 99 cents for the first four weeks and then only $15 per month Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $15 a month