EPA fracking report offers few answers on drinking water

Is hydraulic fracturing — better known as fracking — safe, as the oil and gas industry claims?

WASHINGTON — Is hydraulic fracturing — better known as fracking — safe, as the oil and gas industry claims? Or does the controversial drilling technique that has spurred a domestic energy boom contaminate drinking water, as environmental groups and other critics charge?

After six years and more than the $29 million, the Environmental Protection Agency says it doesn’t know.

A new report issued Tuesday said fracking poses a risk to drinking water in some circumstances, but a lack of information precludes a definitive statement on how severe the risk is.

“Because of the significant data gaps and uncertainties in the available data, it was not possible to fully characterize the severity of impacts, nor was it possible to calculate or estimate the national frequency of impacts on drinking water resources” from fracking activities, the EPA said in a report that raises more questions than answers.

The report removes a finding from a draft issued last year indicating that fracking has not caused “widespread, systemic” harm to drinking water in the United States. Industry groups had hailed the draft EPA study as proof that fracking is safe, while environmentalists seized on the report’s identification of cases where fracking-related activities polluted drinking water.

Fracking involves pumping huge volumes of water, sand and chemicals underground to split open rock formations so oil and gas will flow. The practice has spurred an ongoing energy boom but has raised widespread concerns that it might lead to groundwater contamination, increased air pollution and even earthquakes.

The reactions were reversed on Tuesday. Environmentalists cheered the new report as proof that fracking threatens drinking water, while industry groups complained the Obama administration had yielded to political pressure on its way out the door.

“We are glad EPA resisted oil and gas industry spin, followed the science and delivered the facts,” said John Noel, oil and gas campaigns co-ordinator for Clean Water Action, an advocacy group.

An oil industry spokesman called the report an “absurd” reversal that changes a science-based conclusion to one “based in political ambiguity” just weeks before President Barack Obama leaves office.

“The agency has walked away from nearly a thousand sources of information from … technical reports and peer-reviewed scientific reports demonstrating that … hydraulic fracturing does not lead to widespread, systemic impacts to drinking water resources,” said Erik Milito of the American Petroleum Institute, an industry lobbying group.

The fracking study makes a mockery of frequent pledges by Obama and EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy to follow science as they make decisions, Milito said. “We look forward to working with the new administration (of President-elect Donald Trump) to instil fact-based science back into the public policy process,” he said.

Tom Burke, EPA’s science adviser and a deputy assistant administrator, said in an interview that the removal of the phrase about “widespread, systemic” impacts came at the urging of the EPA’s Science Advisory Board.

Just Posted

Red Deer realtors share precautions in aftermath of Calgary sex assault

“Safety is a huge issue,” says local realtor

Man charged after string of break and enters

Break-ins occurred at rural properties

Updated: Red Deer Mountie’s sexual assault trial begins

RCMP officer facing sexual assault with a weapon and breach of trust charges

Central Albertans invited to bring concerns to air quality meeting

Parkland Airshed Managment Zone holds public meeting June 25

WATCH: Hundreds run in the 5K Foam Fest in Red Deer

The annual event took place at Heritage Ranch on Saturday

Italy’s Milan-Cortina wins vote to host 2026 Winter Olympics

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — Riding a wave of widespread Italian enthusiasm to be… Continue reading

Productivity gains outpace steep rise in agricultural energy use since 1990

CALGARY — Third-generation farmer Ron Lamb remembers his father pulling six-metre-wide crop-seeding… Continue reading

Health: Believing myths is bad for your heart

George Orwell, the English journalist, wrote, “Myths that are believed in tend… Continue reading

Family: We all get by with just a little help from our friends

The celebration of our great country of Canada is waiting in the… Continue reading

Cavallini, David scores 3 goals, Canada defeats Cuba 7-0

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Coach John Herdman couldn’t be happier about the state… Continue reading

Toronto Raptors coach Nick Nurse lands same job with Canada’s men’s team

Toronto Raptors head coach Nick Nurse is the new coach of Canada’s… Continue reading

Steamy romance novelist Judith Krantz dies at 91

LOS ANGELES — Writer Judith Krantz, whose million-selling novels such as “Scruples”… Continue reading

Flying Wallendas safely cross Times Square on high wire

NEW YORK — Two siblings from the famed Flying Wallendas safely crossed… Continue reading

Most Read