A crane is used to move a garbage bin to the upper floors of a condo tower under construction, in Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the coming week

TORONTO — Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the coming week:

June GDP figures:

Statistics Canada is set to release gross domestic product figures by industry for June and gross domestic product by income and expenditure for the second quarter on Tuesday. StatCan said on July 30 that the Canadian economy appeared to have bounced back after its worst two-month stretch since the start of the pandemic, eking out a gain in June and growth in the second quarter of the year.

Real estate update:

August real estate sales figures for Calgary, Vancouver and Toronto will be released on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, respectively. The Canadian Real Estate Association recently said that home sales cooled for their fourth consecutive month in July as new supply fell in about three quarters of all markets across the country.

Laurentian Bank earnings:

Laurentian Bank will hold a conference call to discuss Q3 results on Wednesday. The Montreal-based bank beat expectations in June when it reported a second-quarter profit of $53.1 million, up from a profit of $8.9 million a year ago.

BRP earnings:

BRP will release Q2 results on Thursday. The Quebec-based recreational products company said in July that a fire in its Juarez 2 facility in Mexico destroyed some units representing about six days of production. Chief executive Jose Boisjoli said he didn’t anticipate any material impact on its business from the disruption.

July merchandise trade:

Also on Thursday, Statistics Canada is scheduled to release Canadian international merchandise trade and international trade in services figures for July. StatCan recently said the country posted a merchandise trade surplus of $3.2 billion in June as exports rose and imports fell, resulting in a return to surplus after a $1.6 billion deficit in May.