Local business briefs – March 17

South Centre is expanding east. Red Deer’s municipal planning commission has given site development approval for a 8,870-square-foot commercial building at 2085 Gaetz Ave.

MPC approves commercial building

South Centre is expanding east.

Red Deer’s municipal planning commission has given site development approval for a 8,870-square-foot commercial building at 2085 Gaetz Ave. It would be located east of the existing multi-bay building on the lot, which houses ABC Country Restaurant, Laptop Depot, Wholistix, Subway and Coldwell Banker Real Estate.

Peter Clow, a partner with Cognidyn Engineering & Design, said the new building should be under construction by early summer and ready for occupancy this fall.

The design calls for five bays, three of which would have overhead doors. Clow told the commission that those three would likely be used for warehousing or storage, while the others might be attractive for a commercial business, like a restaurant.

The development will include the addition of 130 parking stalls.

One letter of objection was received by the city, with it expressing concerns about increased garbage, vehicle congestion and noise.

The commission’s approval is conditional upon the development of a solid fence and landscaping along the lot’s east side, and the addition of a sidewalk along its western perimeter.


Steinley elected chairman of safety association

A safety supervisor with a Red Deer construction company has become chair of the Alberta Construction Safety Association.

Iris Steinley, who works for Phoenix Construction Inc., was elected into the position at the association’s annual general meeting in Calgary on Saturday. She is the Alberta Construction Safety Association’s first female chair since its inception in 1988.

A director with the Red Deer Construction Association, Steinley has served on the Alberta Construction Safety Association’s board and executive for a number of years.

The non-profit organization consists of employers in the construction industry whose Alberta Workers’ Compensation Board account falls within participating industry codes.


Barley shortage unlikely to favour local producers: commission

Bitter about the prospects of rising beer prices?

Don’t vent your frustration at farmers, says the Alberta Barley Commission.

A poor malt barley crop in Alberta last year — as well as poor growing conditions in Russia, Ukraine and Australia — is expected to leave maltsters with a feedstock shortage next year. But few producers here are likely to take advantage, said commission chair Matt Sawyer, who farms near Acme.

“If we’d had a great crop in Western Canada, or were expecting one in 2011, this might be bigger news for farmers.

“The unfortunate part for farmers is that in years like this one, the price goes up when there is little to sell. The opposite is also true; when farmers have a lot to sell, the price drops.”

The commission also pointed out that farmers average less than a penny for each bottle of beer sold.

“In the big picture, beer prices are more likely to go up based on packaging materials, taxation and transportation costs,” said Mike Leslie, the commission’s CEO.

The Alberta Barley Commission represents some 17,000 barley producers in this province.