RBC expects home sales to dive 30%, prices to decline because of outbreak

RBC expects home sales to dive 30%, prices to decline because of outbreak

TORONTO — Canada’s housing market could see a significant pullback this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but could rebound next year, a report by RBC says.

This year’s home resales could dive by 30 per cent to a 20-year low as physical distancing limits sales while the economic fallout erodes confidence and leaves speculators sitting on the sidelines, said bank analyst Robert Hogue.

“Canada’s housing market will slow to a crawl this spring as Canadians follow social distancing orders in order to combat the spread of COVID-19.”

Market activity in the Greater Toronto Area is already showing a sharp drop-off.

John Pasalis of Realosophy Realty said in a report that while sales were up 50 per cent in the first two weeks of March compared with a year earlier, by last week sales were down 37 per cent compared with a year earlier, while new listings were down 33 per cent.

Pasalis said average prices are still up over last year, but that prices have trended lower over the month.

Hogue said home prices could stay stable in the near-term as both buyers and new listings pull back, but expects the composite benchmark price to fall 2.9 per cent in the second half of this year compared with last year.

“In a matter of weeks or months, surging unemployment and the market’s illiquidity will compel a growing number of tight-squeezed sellers to make price concessions.”

The trends, however, could reverse next year as low interest rates, a strengthening job market and a bounce-back in immigration help sales to surge more than 40 per cent in 2021 and price dynamics also return to favouring sellers, Hogue said.

The report said Prairie economies that rely on oil will feel the housing pullback more acutely, with price declines “bound to re-accelerate significantly” and little prospect of prices rebounding any time soon.

The report also notes that the bank’s affordability measure, defined as the share of median income needed to cover home ownership, was steady at 50 per cent in Canada in the fourth quarter of 2019. Vancouver was highest at 80.4 per cent, Toronto at 68.2 per cent, while Edmonton was 31.6 per cent.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 31, 2020.

Ian Bickis, The Canadian Press

Keystone XL

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

$2 raise for some health care workers in Alberta over a month late

Delay isn’t from Alberta Health, spokesperson confirms

Central Alberta drowning and Ontario homicide connected: police

Police say there is a connection between two recent deaths – a… Continue reading

Wind warning issued for central Alberta

City of Red Deer and Lacombe under wind warning

QUIZ: Test your knowledge of the world of summer sports

In a typical year, there are plenty of summer sporting events and tournaments held across Canada

SpaceX’s historic encore: Astronauts arrive at space station

SpaceX Dragon capsule pulled up to the station and docked automatically

Ottawa pledges millions to promote holiday travel in Canada during pandemic

Funding announced include $30 million originally earmarked for attracting foreign visitors

Sweats are in, slacks are out: Could ‘work-leisure’ become business as usual?

Many desk-dwellers are opting for sweatpants as work-from-home era has loosened up dress codes

Minimum wage goes up June 1 in B.C. as businesses face COVID-19 challenges

Increase is part of the government’s pledge to implement a $15 per hour minimum wage

In hard-hit Quebec, families struggle to mourn those lost to COVID-19

The province recorded more than 50,000 confirmed cases and over 4,300 deaths as of Friday

Most Read