Retired TD Bank CEO Ed Clark to head up agency that will sell pot in Ontario

TORONTO — Ontario has called in its top business guru to head the agency that will handle the complicated task of selling and distributing recreational marijuana once pot is legalized this summer.

Former TD Bank CEO Ed Clark, who has served as Premier Kathleen Wynne’s business adviser since 2015, was nominated Thursday by Finance Minister Charles Sousa to chair the Liquor Control Board of Ontario’s board of directors.

Clark, who also is working on the province’s bid to land the new Amazon headquarters, will oversee the agency as it creates a subsidiary that will run stand-alone stores to sell legal weed.

The process is likely to be fraught with challenges from municipal pushback to concerns about lack of supply, but Sousa said Clark’s experience makes him the ideal person for the job.

When Clark served as CEO of TD Bank from 2002 to 2014 he focused on the financial institution’s retail operations and customer relations, the government said Thursday.

“He’s a retailer by his nature,” Sousa said. “But he’s also a policy mind. He’s successful. He has the ability to deal very effectively with leaders around the world and we’ve engaged him to do just that on our behalf.”

Clark’s appointment as LCBO chairman was discussed by Ontario’s cabinet Thursday morning and will now be finalized after a review by a committee at Queen’s Park.

The province announced last fall that it plans to create a subsidiary of the Liquor Control Board of Ontario that will run the legal weed stores. The agency itself will oversee the planning process to establish its retail locations.

The province plans to set up approximately 150 standalone cannabis stores by 2020 with the first wave of 40 stores opening this summer.

Clark has handled a number of difficult files for Ontario’s Liberal government in recent years, leading a controversial government asset review in 2014 which recommended the partial selloff of Hydro One. In 2015, Clark advised the province on the restructuring of U.S. Steel Canada in Hamilton. In 2016, he conducted a review of the province’s digital health records system.

For his work, Clark has taken a salary of one dollar per year, something that Sousa joked won’t change.

“As you know he’s been advising and providing some support for the government on a number files and he has been getting his dollar,” Sousa said. “I don’t intend to give him a raise.”

Ontario NDP Finance Critic John Vanthof panned Clark’s hiring saying it sends the signal that the LCBO could be privatized. He urged the premier to cancel Clark’s nomination to the board.

“By appointing Clark to the top post at the LCBO, Wynne is sending strong signals that she won’t stop with the selloff of Hydro One,” Vanthof said in a statement. “Ontarians overwhelmingly opposed that short-sighted move, but Wynne went ahead with her plan anyway, and Ontario families are literally paying the price.”

Ontario Public Service Employees Union President Warren (Smokey) Thomas also called on Wynne to rescind Clark’s appointment.

“Ed Clark has always put profits before people,” Thomas said in a statement. “Giving him the keys to the LCBO will be a huge boon for Bay Street, but it’s going to cause real harm on Main Street.”

Sousa denied Clark’s hiring signals a move to privatize the Crown corporation. Clark himself recommended hanging onto the LCBO in his review of government assets, he said.

“There is no intent on selling LCBO,” he said. “It’s a very efficient, very productive, well-run organization. It’s valuation is tremendous.”

Just Posted

Buffalo Lake residents voice opposition to proposed RV Resort

County of Stettler holds contentious Public Hearing on Paradise Shores RV Resort

Red Deer hospital expansion advances to square one

Planning for future needs gets $1-million over five years

Case of former MLA accused of sex assault, interference back in court next month

Former Innisfail-Sylvan Lake MLA Don MacIntyre’s case to return to court on April 19

Fog advisory for Central Alberta

Fog will dissipate later this morning

WATCH: Hundreds come to Red Deer Rebels Fan Fest

The Red Deer Rebels met with legions of their of fans just… Continue reading

Excavator frees dolphins trapped by pack ice in Newfoundland harbour

HEARTS DELIGHT, N.L. — A pod of dolphins trapped by pack ice… Continue reading

Structure fire destroys home in Mirror

A house in Mirror is completely damaged due to an overnight structure… Continue reading

Trudeau warns senators not to thwart will of Canadians on marijuana bill

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is reminding senators that his government… Continue reading

Burgers outselling classic baguette sandwiches in France

PARIS — Forget the baguette. The French are going crazy for burgers.… Continue reading

Can Zuckerberg’s media blitz take the pressure off Facebook?

NEW YORK — In the wake of a privacy scandal involving a… Continue reading

Brace for more red ink, no good plan for balance in Alberta budget: opposition

EDMONTON — Opposition parties say Albertans should brace for a provincial budget… Continue reading

Police: Austin bomber’s motive still unknown, despite video

PFLUGERVILLE, Texas — A 25-minute cellphone video left behind by the bomber… Continue reading

Facebook crisis-management lesson: What not to do

NEW YORK — The crisis-management playbook is pretty simple: Get ahead of… Continue reading

Most Read

Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $185 for 260 issues (must live in delivery area to qualify) Unlimited Digital Access 99 cents for the first four weeks and then only $15 per month Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $15 a month