Suit: Apple slowed iPhones, forcing owners to buy new ones

CHICAGO — IPhone owners from several states sued Apple Inc. for not disclosing sooner that it issued software updates deliberately slowing older-model phones so aging batteries lasted longer, saying Apple’s silence led them to wrongly conclude that their only option was to buy newer, pricier iPhones.

The allegations were in a lawsuit filed Thursday in Chicago federal court on behalf of five iPhone owners from Illinois, Ohio, Indiana and North Carolina, all of whom say they never would have bought new iPhones had Apple told them that simply replacing the batteries would have sped up their old ones. The suit alleges Apple violated consumer fraud laws.

A similar lawsuit was filed Thursday in Los Angeles. Both suits came a day after Apple confirmed what high-tech sleuths outside the company already observed: The company had deployed software to slow some phones. Apple said it was intended as a fix to deal with degraded lithium-ion batteries that could otherwise suddenly die.

“Our goal is to deliver the best experience for customers, which includes overall performance and prolonging the life of their devices,” an Apple statement said. It said it released the fix for iPhone 6, iPhone 6s and iPhone SE and later extended it to iPhone 7. Apple didn’t respond to a message Friday seeking comment.

The Chicago lawsuit suggests Apple’s motive may have been sinister, though it offers no evidence in the filing.

“Apple’s decision to purposefully … throttle down these devices,” it says, “was undertaken to fraudulently induce consumers to purchase the latest” iPhone.

Plaintiff Kirk Pedelty, of North Carolina, contacted Apple as his frustration grew. However, the lawsuit says: “Nobody from Apple customer support suggested that he replace his battery to improve the performance of his iPhone. … Frustrated by slowdowns and intermittent shutdowns of his iPhone 7, Pedelty purchased an iPhone 8.”

The lawsuit seeks class-action status to represent thousands of iPhone owners nationwide.

Just Posted

Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre outgrows its temporary space

Working with clients in Red Deer and across central Alberta

Horse abusers shouldn’t profit off the sales of sick or starving equines, say women

Too many poor-condition horses are being auctioned off in central Alberta, they maintain

Blaine Calkins easily takes Red Deer-Lacombe for Conservatives

Blaine Calkins won 80 per cent of the vote

Your community calendar

Tuesday The Small Business Centre at Burman University’s School of Business invites… Continue reading

Sylvan Lake brewery hosting creepy cabaret

Boo’s and Brews is hosted by Undercurrent Brewery on Oct. 25

Lacombe, Red Deer judged among Canada’s 20 best places to live

Lacombe has placed fifth in Moneyinc.com’s 20 best places to live in… Continue reading

Ponoka putting former visitor information centre up for sale

Ponoka has declared the building that previously housed the town’s visitor information… Continue reading

Election results reflect a divided nation

Under the guise of a minority victory for Justin Trudeau’s Liberals, Canadians… Continue reading

Canadian rookie Mfiondu Kabengele learning quickly from Clippers superstars

VANCOUVER — Canadian rookie Mfiondu Kabengele knows he has a lot to… Continue reading

Canada beefs up in women’s curling to counter international surge

CALGARY — Canada is deeper in women’s curling talent and so is… Continue reading

The most dangerous celebrity online is revealed

NEW YORK — Actress Alexis Bledel has been bookish and sweet on… Continue reading

Most Read