A member of the Teamsters Local Union 362 hands out flyers to Amazon employees, outside an Amazon facility, to get support and distribute information in Nisku, Alta., on Tuesday. (Photo by The Canadian Press)

A member of the Teamsters Local Union 362 hands out flyers to Amazon employees, outside an Amazon facility, to get support and distribute information in Nisku, Alta., on Tuesday. (Photo by The Canadian Press)

Teamsters to hold unionization vote at Amazon warehouse in Alberta

Teamsters to hold unionization vote at Amazon warehouse in Alberta

CALGARY — A group of warehouse workers in central Alberta could become the first Amazon employees in Canada to hold a unionization vote, and the union behind the campaign says they won’t be the last.

Teamsters Local Union 362 said Tuesday it has filed for a unionization vote at the Amazon warehouse in Nisku, just south of Edmonton. The Alberta Labour Relations Board must verify the application before a date is set, but the union expects a vote to take place before the end of the year.

The Teamsters say this is the first step in an organizing campaign designed to bring Amazon to the bargaining table.The union says it has been in contact with workers employed at Amazon facilities in and around Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Toronto, Milton, Cambridge and Kitchener.

“We have local unions across the country who are building relationships with Amazon workers as we speak. The same thing is going on in the United States,” said Teamsters Canada spokesman Christopher Monette. “(Nisku) certainly won’t be the last.”

The news comes one day after Amazon Canada announced it will hire 15,000 new warehouse and distribution workers in communities across the country this fall to support its ongoing Canadian expansion plans.

Amazon also announced it will increase wages for its front-line, hourly employees in Canada to between $17 an hour and $21.65 an hour, up from its current starting wage of around $16 an hour.

Monette said he believes the wage increases are a response to the union’s ongoing Amazon campaign. But he said those wages are still far below the $24.50 to $31.93 per hour that warehouse workers can make at comparable Teamsters-organized companies. He added that Amazon has also recently done away with a performance-based bonus system that was worth between $100 and $300 a month, meaning some workers don’t think they’ll actually receive more money on their paycheques even with the wage increase.

The demanding work pace and issues of health and safety are also a concern, Monette said.

“Amazon workers are being asked to pick an item every nine to 12 seconds. It’s a pace that is hard on the body,” he said. “We just think Amazon workers deserve better, and Amazon has the capacity to treat its workers in a more fair way.”

Amazon has a history of snuffing out union efforts before they can spread. A failed unionization drive in Alabama this spring was the biggest in Amazon’s history and only the second time that an organizing effort from within the company had come to a vote.

That means the Teamsters will likely have a tough fight ahead of them, said Richard Powers, associate professor with the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto.

“I think it will be (difficult), only because of who they’re dealing with,” Powers said. “As we’ve seen in the United States, Amazon has gone to great lengths to keep unions out.”

Still, Powers said the COVID-19 pandemic has shifted the balance of power between employees and employers.

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