When looking for a job, read the qualifications in the job posting carefully. Then present your education/credentials accordingly. (File photo)

When looking for a job, read the qualifications in the job posting carefully. Then present your education/credentials accordingly. (File photo)

Job hunt: Your education needs to align with job requirements

After your professional experience, your education/certifications (verified skills) will be the next section on your resumé the reader will use to judge whether you go into the “to be interviewed” pile.

Many job seekers apply to job postings knowing they don’t have the education/certification requirements. They believe their “experience” will compensate. With so many highly qualified job seekers now on the job market this is rarely the case. If your education/certifications align with the job requirements, the education section of your resumé will play a critical part in setting you apart from all the “spray and pray” job seekers.

Suppose a job posting for a Director of Finance lists as a qualification “Canadian Accounting Designation (CPA).” You have a university degree and 15 years of experience managing a mid-size company’s finances, but no CPA – don’t bother applying. Job postings generate an influx of applicants. Undoubtedly there’ll be many applicants who possess a CPA applying. There’s also the employer’s ATS to consider, which likely has been programmed to scan for “CPA.”

Education background information you should provide:

l Degree/certification obtained

l School’s name

l Location of school

l Period of attendance

l Relevant coursework

l Honors, academic recognition, extracurricular activities, or organizations participation worth mentioning

When it comes to presenting your educational background keep your ego in check. You may have impressive education background; however, it may not be impressive for the job you’re vying for. Prioritize relevancy over perceived prestige.

Here’s my suggestion how to present your education/certificates (there’s no hard formatting rule):

BS Biomedical Science

University of Calgary, Calgary, AB — 09/1992 – 06/1996

Courses:

l Principles of Human Genetics

l Organismal Biology

l Principles and Mechanisms of Pharmacology

l Advanced Bioinformatics

As I’ve pointed out in previous columns – there’s no universal hiring methodology. No two hiring managers assess candidates the same way. Depending on the job requirements respective employers search for different things when it comes to a candidate’s education. Read the qualifications in the job posting carefully. Then present your education/credentials accordingly. Don’t hesitate to add/remove courses to better tie in your education towards the job. It’s for this reason I suggest you list courses, not just your degree/certification. Listing of courses is rarely done, doing so will give your resumé a competitive advantage.

You’ll have noticed my examples indicated start and end dates. Many career experts advise against this. The thinking being dates, even just the graduation year, will give employer’s a sense of your age, which if you are over 45 can hinder and prolong your job search. This advice is supposed to be a workaround to ageism. However, these same career experts unanimously agree employment dates (month/year) need to be indicated. To me, this is a mixed message.

I believe in complete transparency from both sides of the hiring process. Full transparency ensures the likelihood of there being a solid fit for both parties. At some point, whether when the employer checks your digital footprint or interviews you, your interviewer will have a good indication of your age. Besides, not mentioning dates, which I call “obvious” information, is a red flag.

If your age is a deal-breaker with an employer, they aren’t the employer for you. The job search advice I give most often: Seek employers who’ll most likely accept you, where you’ll feel you belong – look for your tribe.

Some professions, such as finance or healthcare, require specific certifications or degrees. In such cases, show you have the necessary “must-have” (a deal-breaker if you don’t) credentials by placing your education at the top of the page just below your contact information before your professional experience.

One last note: Often overlooked is education in progress. If relevant, this should be included in your resumé. In this case, list pertinent courses and the month/year you intend to graduate.

Nick Kossovan, a seasoned veteran of the corporate landscape in Canada, offers advice on searching for a job. Send him your questions at artoffindingwork@gmail.com.