Brothers collaborate to produce award-winning sound

It’s been a whirlwind year for The Bros. Landreth, who perform Friday, Sept. 23, in Sylvan Lake.

It’s been a whirlwind year for The Bros. Landreth, who perform Friday, Sept. 23, in Sylvan Lake.

The Winnipeg musicians not only landed a 2015 Juno Award for best roots album, but had the surreal moment of having John Oates open for them on stage in Nashville.

The group’s frontman and guitarist, Joey Landreth feels this must be a case of brotherly devotion spawning success — for four years ago, their band didn’t even exist.

Joey and his older brother Dave, a bassist, had been touring as backup musicians for different bands. “I was out with Doc Walker and Emerson Drive and David was with Imaginary Cities…” recalled Joey.

“We had a long, rough tour, and I was missing home and missing my brother.”

Since the two could rarely spend time together, Joey proposed in 2013 that they take a few months off from touring with other people to try writing songs they could perform as a duo.

It turned out to be a collaborative “Lennon and McCartney thing,” recalled Joey. “Dave is more the wordsmith, whereas I tend to wear my heart on my sleeve…”

“We wrote one song, and thought, hey! That’s a pretty good tune, actually…” After jointly writing more songs, they decided they should make a record.

The brothers, whose father is noted Winnipeg musician Wally Landreth, eventually lined up a drummer for their band (Cody Iwasiuk is the current beat man, taking over from Brian Voth) and a second guitarist (Ariel Posen), and began performing live at music festivals around Manitoba.

When their heart-felt breakup song, Let It Lie, the title track of the group’s debut album, gained traction and radio play, the musicians found themselves in the unbelievable position of being nominated for a Juno Award for Best Traditional/Roots Album.

Joey recalled that neither he nor Dave thought they had a hope of winning in a field of nominees that also included Blackie and the Rodeo Kings and Elliott Brood. Since they never prepared an acceptance speech, they found themselves tongue-tied at the podium after their win.

Joey admitted it initially felt odd to beat out more seasoned groups. “Later, I ran into Colin Linden (from Blackie and the Rodeo Kings) and said, ‘You guys should have won.’ But he told me, ‘Naw, man, we didn’t need it… You guys do.’”

The brothers are gratified by the peer recognition — which has also been extended to them by American musician John Oates.

The Hall & Oates member, who has the same agent as The Bros. Landreth, liked the Canadian group’s sound so much, he volunteered to open for their Nashville concert with his three-piece band.

“(Oates) said, ‘I don’t do this as a headline spot… Would you mind if I opened for you?’ recalled Joey. “It was kind of ridiculous!” — and a huge honour.

While the Juno Award hasn’t astonishingly altered the musicians’ lives, Joel has noticed it’s easier to get show bookings now and The Bros. Landreth are drawing larger audiences.

They look forward to performing the local Autumn Leaves concert, part of Sylvan Lake’s Jazz at the Lake music series. “You know you’ll be playing for a crowd that’s there to listen to your music,” unlike at bars where people laugh and talk, said Joey.

He grew up listening to his sideman dad, as well as Boz Scaggs, John Hiatt, Lyle Lovett and Ry Cooder, while his classmates were into standard rock or pop. “People used to tell me that I was born at the wrong time, but it turns out that I was born at exactly the right time! It’s a good time to be here, performing (roots) music,” concluded Joey, referring to the folk revival with younger listeners.

“There’s a lot of bad music out there that’s being force-fed to people…” he added, while roots music has more honest themes. “People need this music,” because it taps into the human condition.

For more ticket information about the band’s 8 p.m. show at Alliance Church in Sylvan Lake, please visit www.jazzatthelake.com.

lmichelin@bprda.wpengine.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alberta reported an additional 1,980 cases of COVID-19 Friday. (NIAID-RML via AP)
Red Deer adds 37th death from COVID-19, active cases drop

Alberta Health identified an additional 1,980 cases of the virus province-wide

A rodeo south of Bowden drew a huge crowd on May 1 and 2, 2021. (Photo courtesy Mom’s Diner’s Facebook page)
Kris Sturgess with Calgary Ghostbusters. (Photo from GoFundMe)
GoFundMe account salutes Red Deer prop builder

Kris Sturgess died unexpectedly April 28

The City of Red Deer says it has not implemented a curfew and will continue to explore options and do what is necessary based on provincial direction. (Advocate file photo).
COVID curfew not on Red Deer city council’s agenda

Red Deer creeping up to 1,000 COVID-19 cases

FILE - A firefighter wears a mask as he drives his truck. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward, File
VIDEO: Flames rip through Edmonton-area seniors complex, but no fatalities

ST. ALBERT, Alta. — Fire has destroyed part of a retirement complex… Continue reading

FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020, file photo, the Rev. Jacqui Lewis, senior pastor at Middle Collegiate Church, speaks during an interfaith gathering outside of the Judson Memorial Church near Washington Square Park in New York. Muslims, Jews, Christians and Buddhists came together to show solidarity among faith communities as the country awaited the final result of the U.S. presidential election. (AP Photo/Emily Leshner, File)
National Day of Prayer inspires pleas for unity and justice

National Day of Prayer inspires pleas for unity and justice

Rona Ambrose is shown during an interview with The Canadian Press in Ottawa, Thursday, May 18, 2017. New judges will have to commit to take training in sexual assault law, thanks to a new law that received royal assent last night. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand
Judges’ sexual assault training bill receives royal assent after clearing the Senate

OTTAWA, Ohio — New judges will have to commit to take training… Continue reading

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau walks to a news conference in Ottawa on Tuesday May 4, 2021. A broad coalition of MPs from all five parties wants the federal government to support waiving the global rules that guard vaccine trade secrets. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
As MPs urge support, Trudeau demurs on whether government backs COVID-19 waiver

WASHINGTON — Justin Trudeau stopped well short Friday of endorsing efforts to… Continue reading

Workers perform ground preparations outside City Hall in Yellowknife on Monday, July 4, 2011. A recent outbreak of COVID-19 cases in Yellowknife is mostly affecting children and youth, the territory’s chief public health officer says. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Most of Yellowknife’s COVID-19 cases are in children and youth: public health officer

YELLOWKNIFE — A health official in the Northwest Territories says a recent… Continue reading

Statistics Canada building and signs are pictured in Ottawa on Wednesday, July 3, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
A year after jobs data leak, StatCan resumes sharing advance numbers with officials

OTTAWA — Statistics Canada has resumed its practice of giving key federal… Continue reading

jobs - T - 3-6-2020
Job search: 10 ways to make your LinkedIn profile stand out in 2021

In 2021 successful job hunting requires having a LinkedIn profile that’s current… Continue reading

Max Parrot of Canada competes in the men’s snowboard big air final at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. Parrot has won the Comeback of the Year honour at the Laureus World Sports Awards. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Canadian snowboarder Max Parrot wins Laureus World Sports Award for comeback

Parrot beat out former Washington Football Team quarterback Alex Smith

Most Read