“A Whitehorse Winter Classic” feels less enthused about Christmas than a typical holiday album. (Photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS)

“A Whitehorse Winter Classic” feels less enthused about Christmas than a typical holiday album. (Photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS)

With a flurry of Christmas albums, Canadian artists find unique ways to mark the season

TORONTO — Folk-rockers Whitehorse spent years fending off pressure to write a Christmas song.

And yet every holiday season, the husband-and-wife duo would be circled by the head of their record label who wanted to rope them into making a holiday ditty. Radio would love it, they were told.

But for the longest time Luke Doucet and Melissa McClelland weren’t convinced. They didn’t see the point of throwing another track onto the pile of disposable festive anthems.

“There are a lot of beautiful Christmas songs,” McClelland acknowledges before adding that she rarely plays any of them at home.

“You hear enough of it out in the world.”

Doucet winces as he reflects on one example that deeply scarred him — Paul McCartney’s 1979 track “Wonderful Christmastime,” which he says rings through the halls of department stores so interminably that he feels pushed to the edge.

So it’s not surprising that “A Whitehorse Winter Classic” feels less enthused about Christmas than a typical holiday album. The sobering nine-track collection offers a mixture of reflection, loneliness and bittersweet sentiment.

The album stands out this year amongst a considerable selection of Canadian artists who are tapping into listeners’ insatiable appetite for the holiday season.

No fewer than six homegrown acts have released full-length Christmas albums in 2018. That includes a jazzy effort from Serena Ryder, a country-fused release by Jess Moskaluke and carols and hymns by contemporary Christian musician Matt Maher.

There’s also Walk Off the Earth’s newest Christmas release and William Shatner’s quirky record “Shatner Claus,” where the “Star Trek” alum riffs on classics of the genre.

Whitehorse is easily the darkest spin on the yuletide season.

“It is an emotionally rich time,” McClelland said. “A time of nostalgia. And that can be a very complicated feeling of highs and lows, the good and bad.”

The band’s cover of the Pretenders’ downbeat “2000 Miles” marks one of the most familiar highlights, while the bouncy original “Ho Ho Ho” throws some pep into the story of a loved one who’s stuck at the airport, presumably on Christmas Eve.

“Merry Xmas, Baby (I Hope You Get What You Deserve),” carries a glaringly spiteful twist. Doucet describes the song as the Pixies meet The La’s with a sprinkle of inspiration from the “Kids in the Hall” theme song.

“If (the songs) are not about Christmas specifically, they will be evocative of some of the ways people feel,” Doucet says.

Making a Christmas album used to be one of the necessary steps in nearly every major artist’s recording contract — somewhere between their debut album and a greatest hits collection. The point was to goose sales over the holidays as shoppers tossed a CD into their carts while buying gifts.

Practically all of the biggest stars have done it at some point, including Canadian artists Celine Dion, Michael Buble, Justin Bieber and Sarah McLachlan, who’s released two holiday albums. But with CD sales flagging for years, Christmas songs have taken on a different value through streaming music platforms.

For a few weeks each year, performers in various music genres are lumped into official playlists across Spotify, Apple Music and other services, each one offering the possibility of exposing them to an array of new listeners — and potentially lifelong fans.

Overall, the quantity of Christmas music being streamed by Canadians is growing at a steady pace each year, according to Nielsen Music Canada. Last year, holiday music plays were up 30 per cent from 2016, which itself had grown 80 per cent from the year prior.

This year, holiday streams are up 42 per cent as more listeners put away old CDs and dive into collections like Spotify’s Christmas in Canada and Apple’s A Very Canadian Christmas.

Wes Marskell, drummer for indie rock pair The Darcys, knows a few things about the resonance of a Christmas tune. Two years ago, his band released a cover of Mariah Carey favourite “All I Want for Christmas Is You,” spiced with electronic beats, and it became a cult hit on streaming platforms.

Last Christmas, The Darcys returned to the holidays with the original ”Another Log on the Fire,” and watched as listeners added it to their playlist rotations en masse.

“People literally put a Christmas playlist on repeat all day, starting November 1st,” Marskell says.

“This is a time when people are just thirsty for Christmas.”

Walk Off the Earth’s Sarah Blackwood says chasing those listeners is one of the reasons her band released the six-track EP ”Subscribe to the Holidays.” It’s their third holiday album, and part of a tradition she says helps achieve the “ultimate goal” of scoring valuable real estate on playlists.

“The higher you get on a playlist… the more people are listening to your music,” Blackwood says.

“I just renovated a studio and the whole time I would just say: ‘Hey Siri,’ or, ‘Hey Alexa, play an acoustic covers playlist on Spotify.’ And there it is. It goes on and on, and you’re discovering artists.”

Like Walk Off the Earth’s famed YouTube videos — which launched them into the viral stratosphere with a cover of Gotye’s “Somebody That I Used to Know” — the band’s upbeat Christmas album includes a number of songs that perfect for social media.

The reggae-fused “Happy Hanukkah” features radio favourite Scott Helman, while ”Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” showcases Blackwood’s five-year-old son on the vocals.

The band will take their Christmas spirit to a number of public platforms in the coming weeks, including Good Morning America and a series of entertainment talk show appearances.

Playing Christmas gigs is another one of the perks of a holiday album, says Serena Ryder. The singer dove wholeheartedly into the season with an appearance at Toronto’s Santa Claus Parade last year before stepping into the studio to record “Christmas Kisses.”

The project offered an avenue for Ryder to dabble in her dreams of producing a jazz album, a sound which takes shape on renditions of “Let It Snow” and “I’ll Be Home for Christmas.” She’ll bring those songs to a number of concerts on the East Coast this month.

“I hope that doing this album means I get to do Christmas shows every year,” Ryder says.

“They’re such a joyful experience. Parents. Kids. All those things.”

Whitehorse is taking a comparably muted approach with their own ”A Whitehorse Winter Classic.”

They aren’t planning tour dates for the holidays, although they will appear in guest spots at other artists’ shows. That leaves their album to either organically land among the favourites of the season or disappear into the catalogue of Christmases past.

“If we’re wildly successful,” Doucet says, “then people will put it on every year. It’ll have a resurgence.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

RCMP have charged a Sylvan Lake man for allegedly defrauding five people of more than $100,000.
Advocate file photo
20-year-old woman killed in collision: Blackfalds RCMP

A 20-year-old woman was killed in a collision on Saturday, says Blackfalds… Continue reading

Patrick Malkin, co-owner of The Granary Kitchen, says he wants the provincial government to lift COVID-19 restrictions that shutdown in-person dining. (File photo by Advocate staff)
Red Deer restaurant owner ‘frustrated’ in-person dining restrictions are still in place

Dr. Deena Hinshaw announced the restrictions won’t yet be eased this past Thursday

As of Friday, Alberta has under 10,000 active COVID-19 cases. (Image courtesy CDC)
Alberta identifies 573 new COVID-19 cases, 13 deaths on Saturday

There are currently 9,727 active cases of the virus in the province

A firetruck sits in front of a home on Harvey Close in Red Deer Saturday afternoon. (Photo by Sean McIntosh/Advocate staff)
Firefighters respond to Red Deer fire

Red Deer firefighters responded to a blaze in the north part of… Continue reading

(Courtesy photo)
Red Deer rental prices drop slightly

Renting an apartment in Red Deer became slightly cheaper last month. Rentals.ca… Continue reading

Terrance Josephson of the Princeton Posse, at left, and Tyson Conroy of the Summerland Steam clash during a Junior B hockey game at the Summerland Arena in the early spring of 2020. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)
QUIZ: How much do you know about hockey?

Test your knowledge of Canada’s national winter sport

A woman injects herself with crack cocaine at a supervised consumption site Friday, Jan. 22, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Drug users at greater risk of dying as services scale back in second wave of COVID-19

OTTAWA — Under fluorescent lights, Wendy Muckle surveys the supervised consumption site… Continue reading

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) headquarters Connaught Building is pictured in Ottawa on Monday, Aug. 17, 2020. nbsp; THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Taxpayers’ watchdog sees complaints spike, raising worries about pandemic tax season

OTTAWA — Canada’s taxpayers’ ombudsperson says his office has seen a steep… Continue reading

Wet'suwet'en supporters and Coastal GasLink opponents continue to protest outside the B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, February 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
‘We’re still in it’: Wet’suwet’en push forward on rights recognition

Tensions had reached a boiling point over a natural gas pipeline in… Continue reading

An Uber driver's vehicle is seen after the company launched service, in Vancouver, Friday, Jan. 24, 2020. Several taxi companies have lost a court bid to run Uber and Lyft off the road in British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Taxi companies lose court bid to quash Uber, Lyft approvals in British Columbia

VANCOUVER — Several Metro Vancouver taxi companies have lost a court bid… Continue reading

Lights on an internet switch illuminate a network cable in an office in Ottawa, Thursday, February 10, 2011. A Federal Court is ordering Canada's internet service providers to block websites for a company that's offering pirated television streaming online. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
‘Deeply disturbing:’ Nunavut internet still slower, more costly than rest of country

IQALUIT, Nunavut — In Nunavut, it’s not unusual for the internet to… Continue reading

RCMP say missing teen Hope Tivendale has been found. (File photo by Advocate staff)
No foul play suspected after burned body of homeless person found in North Vancouver

VANCOUVER — A burned body, believed to be of a homeless person,… Continue reading

The central zone experienced a spike in the number of COVID-19 cases Thursday, rising from 454 to 508 active cases over the past 24 hours, with 10 people in hospital. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)
Spartan Bioscience says Health Canada has approved its rapid COVID-19 test

TORONTO — An Ottawa company says it’s received approval from Health Canada… Continue reading

Most Read