Copyright rules raise questions

Well it was nice to get a response from Red Deer MP Earl Dreeshen (Government maintains fair dealing in its new copyright legislation, re. Bill C-32, the Copyright Modernization Act).

Well it was nice to get a response from Red Deer MP Earl Dreeshen (Government maintains fair dealing in its new copyright legislation, re. Bill C-32, the Copyright Modernization Act).

No matter what sugar coating they put on it, digital locks are dangerous.

In 2005, Sony BMG installed ‘copy protection measures’ on CDs. This then installed a rootkit on Windows machines when the CD was played. This caused many machines to be infected with malware and viruses, which crashed a lot of computers. There are class action suits from California, Texas and New York.

And then there are the comments made by Michele Austin, who served as Maxime Bernier’s chief of staff when he was Industry minister.

According to Austin, the decision to introduce U.S.-style Digital Millennium Copyright Act rules in Canada in 2007 was strictly a political decision, the result of pressure from the Prime Minister’s Office and a desire to meet U.S. demands. She states “the Prime Minister’s Office’s position was, move quickly, satisfy the United States.” When Bernier and then-Canadian Heritage Minister Bev Oda protested, the PMO replied “we don’t care what you do, as long as the U.S. is satisfied.”

Now don’t get me wrong. I am all for copyright protection for artists but when you are strong-armed into it by another country, something is wrong.

The Recording Industry Association of America in the States spent $64 million in legal fees to recover $1,361,000.00 over three years. The artists have yet to see any of this ‘recovered’ money. Now if you have a business where you can rip off the consumer, the artists that you represent and get the government to help you do it, that has to be the greatest business plan ever.

Gordon Rough

Red Deer