Our gun laws are in poor taste

Re. recent media reports concerning Saskatchewan Conservative MP Garry Breitkreuz being dropped as a speaker at a gun lobby dinner in Ontario:

Re. recent media reports concerning Saskatchewan Conservative MP Garry Breitkreuz being dropped as a speaker at a gun lobby dinner in Ontario:

Clayton Pecknold, Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police spokesperson, called a handgun raffle to be held at the dinner “in poor taste.”

Here’s what truly is in poor taste: Police chiefs who like to download their failure to do their job, i.e., control criminal gangs and drug dealers, onto the backs of ordinary, law-abiding gun owners.

it’s too bad the $2 billion blown in the past 10 years on licensing and registering law-abiding gun-owners hadn’t been available to police to allow them to deal with the real problem: crime.

Instead of registering criminals and interdicting illegal flow of guns from outside the country, our Liberal government gave us a law that registers the law-abiding. Kafka would be impressed.

Hypocrisy No. 1: Police chiefs who believe that it is OK for them to be armed (gun, Taser, pepper spray, billy club) because there are bad, dangerous criminals out there, but that such is not OK for ordinary citizens with equivalent training and background to have the same tools to protect themselves.

Do the police chiefs not walk the same streets and live in the same neighborhoods as the rest of us? Why the double standard?

Hypocrisy No. 2: High-ranking politicians and bureaucrats who travel with armed body guards to protect themselves out there in the big, bad world, but who do not allow same for an ordinary citizen.

Why the double standard?

Somehow the value of one life is greater than that of another in the rose-coloured world of those who wrote, and promote, this wasteful law.

Orwell said it best: “Some are more equal than others.”

Police chiefs, bureaucrats and others who lie to the public in order to advance their nefarious agenda are also a “Poor Taste of the Year” contender.

For example, using false “stolen guns” numbers – which, by the way, do not include the guns stolen from or lost by the police themselves or from the military.

The only objective for these people is to win this debate, at any cost. The ends justify the means to them.

Canada’s gun law began with a lie – one that was so blatant that finally someone in the RCMP stepped up and publicly corrected it for Parliament and Allan Rock.

The lies continue to this day. Tell a lie often enough and it becomes truth for those who do not dig into the whole story. Orwell must be turning over in his grave.

More poor taste: The arbitrary criminalization of gun owners for not having a piece of paper from Ottawa that affords a defence to what otherwise would be a crime (i.e., possession of a gun in Canada).

Morgentaler fought the same battle (without written permission from a doctor, it was crime in Canada to obtain an abortion).

As a defence lawyer, I can state that most of my gun clients have never seen the inside of a court room. “Your papers please” is the reality for gun-owners since this odious law was passed.

It gets worse: Who would have thought that drug dealers have more rights to be secure against unlawful search and seizure by the police? Well, the “inspection” provisions of the Firearms Act create just that incredible reality.

See s.104, et seq of the Firearms Act for the ugly truth.

When did firearms become such a problem in Canada that gun-owners’ rights should be so badly trashed?

Does the average Canadian care about this? If not, then get ready for the “fat tax” and other prohibitions. The nanny-state knows best, after all.

Poor taste might be best illustrated by looking at the real causes of injury in Canada – the ones with the big numbers – drownings, falls, car accidents.

The rate of injury or harm each year in Canada by firearms is so low that life insurers do not ask if an applicant owns guns. They do, however, ask if the applicant smokes, scuba dives, sky dives, races cars, etc.. They inquire about statistically dangerous activities.

For less than $10 per year, a gun-owner gets $5 million insurance for her shooting activities. The insurance companies make money on this paltry premium. Why? The claims rate is infinitesimally small. But the demonization of a lawful activity enjoyed by about seven million to 10 million Canadians is none the less ongoing.

It sells newspapers, of course. Politicians believe it will help them get re-elected.

The truth and objective analysis have fallen victim in this smear campaign.

“Not in my Canada” apparently applies only to that portion of (mostly urban) citizens who believe that their vision of Canada is the only one. In my Canada, responsible people of all walks of life own guns.

I find it to be especially “poor taste” that there are some who have a pathological fear of inanimate objects.

Firearms do not go off by themselves.

It takes criminal intent to commit a crime with a gun.

This is not a difficult concept for most; yet there are many who fear the thing, fear that their neighbour has one of those things.

These same people believe that since they do not trust themselves with inanimate things that could cause harm in the wrong hands, nobody else should be allowed to have those things, even if in a responsible way.

I am pretty sure this is a kind of mental illness.

Richard Fritze

Red Deer

Editor’s note: The letter writer is a lawyer.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A nurse gets a swab ready at a temporary COVID-19 test clinic in Montreal, on Friday, May 15, 2020. Health Canada has reversed course on home test kits for COVID-19, saying it will now review applications for such devices. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
Alberta declines Ontario’s request to send health-care workers

Alberta is “not in a position” to send health-care workers out of… Continue reading

Meghan Huizing has been selected by Red Deer Catholic Regional Schools as a finalist for the Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) 2021 Edwin Parr Award. (Photo courtesy of Red Deer Regional Catholic Schools)
Red Deer Catholic names finalist for Edwin Parr Award

Meghan Huizing from St. Gregory the Great Catholic School in Blackfalds has… Continue reading

GrammaLink-Africa members are participating in the Stride to Turn the Tide campaign until June 30. (Contributed photo)
Red Deer group walking to raise money for African grandmothers

A group of central Albertans will be walking every day until the… Continue reading

Westerner Days could be in line to have patrons in attendance this summer as the province teased reducing COVID-19 capacity limits on outdoor events. File photo by ADVOCATE staff
Province provides hope for attendance at summer events

The province has given a positive update to organizations that hold summer… Continue reading

Red Deer Public Schools will not pilot the new draft curriculum at its elementary schools. (File photo contributed by Red Deer Public Schools)
UPDATED: Red Deer Public Schools says no to piloting new curriculum

Alberta Teachers’ Association support school boards

Downtown Iqaluit, Nunavut, is shown after 2 p.m. sunset on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020. Nunavut has declared an outbreak of COVID-19 in Iqaluit after 12 new cases were reported overnight. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Emma Tranter
COVID-19 outbreak declared in Iqaluit as infection numbers rise after first case

COVID-19 outbreak declared in Iqaluit as infection numbers rise after first case

Three vials of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine are pictured in a new coronavirus, COVID-19, vaccination center at the Velodrome-Stadium in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Michael Sohn, pool
Pfizer supply bolstered as Moderna cuts delivery, Ontario turns down Trudeau’s help

Pfizer supply bolstered as Moderna cuts delivery, Ontario turns down Trudeau’s help

Lights on an internet switch are lit up as with users in an office in Ottawa, on February 10, 2011. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Analysts say CRTC ruling will help regional carriers with new limits on Big Three

Analysts say CRTC ruling will help regional carriers with new limits on Big Three

In this May 26, 2018, file photo, people listen to Michael Franti perform at the BottleRock Napa Valley music festival in Napa, Calif. Canadian music festival organizers hoped this summer would mark a return to concerts, but as COVID-19 cases rage on many have already dropped off the calendar. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Eric Risberg
Facing the music: Summer concert festival organizers see no path ahead in pandemic

Facing the music: Summer concert festival organizers see no path ahead in pandemic

FILE - Ali Stroker accepts the award for best performance by an actress in a featured role in a musical for her performance in "Rodgers & Hammerstein's Oklahoma!" at the 73rd annual Tony Awards in New York on June 9, 2019. Stroker teamed up with middle grade author Stacy Davidowitz for a new children's book "The Chance to Fly," published this week. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)
Singer with disability shines in Ali Stroker’s new kids book

Singer with disability shines in Ali Stroker’s new kids book

Retired Ohio sheriff and tiny K-9 partner die the same day

Retired Ohio sheriff and tiny K-9 partner die the same day

Musicians play Sikh hymns during Vaisakhi celebrations at Guru Nanak Darbar of Long Island, Tuesday, April 13, 2021 in Hicksville, N.Y. Sikhs across the United States are holding toned-down Vaisakhi celebrations this week, joining people of other faiths in observing major holidays cautiously this spring as COVID-19 keeps an uneven hold on the country. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
Sikhs mark toned-down holiday amid continuing virus concerns

Sikhs mark toned-down holiday amid continuing virus concerns

Have an opinion you'd like to share? Submit letters to the editor through our website, via email or the postal service. (Heather Colpitts/Black Press Media)
Letter: MLAs who are against tougher restrictions have no plan for consequences

The group of UCP MLAs pushing to end lockdowns are exacerbating what… Continue reading

Most Read