Perhaps customer service will improve

I was encouraged by an item on CBC Radio a few mornings ago. It stated that the economic downturn gave employers a great opportunity to put emphasis on “quality service.” That was the best news I’ve heard in a long time.

I was encouraged by an item on CBC Radio a few mornings ago. It stated that the economic downturn gave employers a great opportunity to put emphasis on “quality service.” That was the best news I’ve heard in a long time.

I, for one, am sick of rude, poorly trained, indifferent and incompetent staff in the Red Deer retail area; bus drivers having personal chats on their cellphones: cashiers preoccupied with text messaging; pubescent sales clerks far too busy gossiping to offer me assistance.

Seldom am I greeted. I hear neither “please,” nor “thank you” at the till. And then, when I am about to leave, I am told, “Have a nice day!” I feel like saying I would have a better day if you were friendly, helpful and mannerly.

I have stopped shopping in places with bad service (and that includes the grocery nearest my home, which has until recently received 90 per cent of my grocery dollar).

I sometimes wonder if I’m being too picky, an old-timer expecting yesterday’s standards in today’s world. Maybe. But, the bottom line is, the buck rests in my pocket, and I’ll spend it where it pleases me.

Diane Clarke

Red Deer