German burg may have inspired Shelley’s Frankenstein

Boris Karloff never walked these grounds, but the history of Burg Frankenstein may have inspired Mary Shelley’s famous monster.

MUEHLTAL, Germany — Boris Karloff never walked these grounds, but the history of Burg Frankenstein may have inspired Mary Shelley’s famous monster.

It has also inspired one of the oldest Halloween parties in Germany, started by the U.S. Army 31 years ago.

Since then an estimated 15,000 people flock to the former keep near Darmstadt in western Germany annually for chills, frights and the chance to walk through the halls of the place that many believe inspired the creation of The Modern Prometheus, as Shelley subtitled her famous novel.

This year, the weekend parties started Oct. 24 and extend through Nov. 9.

Once a massive fortress, all that remains now of the castle is a pair of towers and a chapel.

But that is plenty of space for Halloween-inspired mischief and merry mayhem with a torture chamber, fireworks, flaming swords and, of course, a rather tall, grey-tinged hulking collection of body parts with a major fear of fire.

What’s left of the 1,000-year-old castle — it was first mentioned in local records in 948 — offers the perfect atmosphere for thrill-seeking.

A shuttle bus winds up through the dark woods and at the top there are only festival lights and the stars overhead.

Some 80 monsters lurk inside the castle walls ready to give the guests what they came for. Witches banter back and forth, casting spells outside their hut.

A deadly pale lumberjack sneaks up behind the unsuspecting and his chain saw roars to life.

In the darkness, a werewolf growls, trying to chew on a living ear, and vampires crane to bite exposed necks of passer-by.

Walter Scheele, a writer and chronicler of the castle, has traced the history of both the castle and the festival.

Halloween came in earnest with the U.S. Army, he said.

“After the Second World War the U.S. Army stayed in Darmstadt and they brought Halloween with them,” he told the Associated Press.

“They had their party at the barracks until it was too noisy and they asked if they could have it at the castle instead.”

Mathias Buehrer, who owned the Frankenstein Inn inside the castle at the time, agreed to host the festivities.

It’s been there ever since.

The castle itself is also believed to have influenced Shelley, though there is some debate how much.

The generally accepted notion is that she passed by the castle at night, but Scheele said his research is more thorough.

“Mary Shelley got the name Victor von Frankenstein from the physician and alchemist Johann Conrad Dippel von Frankenstein,” said Scheele, who has written two books about the castle and its legends.

“Dippel took bodies from the graveyard in Nieder-Beer-bach and the minister told everyone in the local parish said that he used the body parts to create a monster,” he explained.

Just Posted

Sunny weather improves farmers’ prospects

A harvester kicking up dust. It’s a picture that will bring a… Continue reading

Rural transit pilot project being considered

Penhold, Innisfail and Red Deer County councils to decide whether to go ahead with project

Red Deer fire station up for sale

Home sweet home at Fire Station 4

Most surveyed Innisfail residents give urban chickens the thumbs up

Town of Innisfail will discuss whether to allow backyard chickens on Monday

‘Mom I’m in trouble:’ Canadian, Brit face 10 years in jail for alleged graffiti

GRANDE PRAIRIE, Alta. — The mother of a Canadian who was arrested… Continue reading

Coyote on the prowl near Penhold

This coyote was out on the prowl in a field just west… Continue reading

Sky’s the limit as Calgary opens testing area for drones and new technologies

CALGARY — The sky’s the limit as the city of Calgary opens… Continue reading

Hi Mickey, ‘Bye Mickey: 6 Disney parks on 2 coasts in 1 day

ORLANDO, Fla. — Heather and Clark Ensminger breathed sighs of relief when… Continue reading

Court weighs ‘Apprentice’ hopeful’s suit versus Trump

NEW YORK — President Donald Trump’s lawyers hope to persuade an appeals… Continue reading

StarKist admits fixing tuna prices, faces $100 million fine

SAN FRANCISCO — StarKist Co. agreed to plead guilty to a felony… Continue reading

Annual pace of inflation slows to 2.2 per cent in September: Statistics Canada

OTTAWA — The annual pace of inflation slowed more than expected in… Continue reading

Jury finds Calgary couple guilty in 2013 death of toddler son

CALGARY — A jury has convicted a Calgary couple in the death… Continue reading

Most Read