Phone-in-cheek: Spike seen in cellphone-linked face injuries

Add facial cuts, bruises and fractures to the risks from cellphones and carelessly using them.

That’s according to a study published Thursday that found a spike in U.S. emergency room treatment for these mostly minor injuries.

The research was led by a facial plastic surgeon whose patients include a woman who broke her nose when she dropped her phone on her face. Dr. Boris Paskhover of Rutgers New Jersey Medical School said his experience treating patients with cellphone injuries prompted him to look into the problem.

Paskhover and others analyzed 20 years of emergency room data and found an increase in cellphone injuries starting after 2006, around the time when the first smartphones were introduced.

Some injuries were caused by phones themselves, including people getting hit by a thrown phone. But Paskhover said many were caused by distracted use including texting while walking, tripping and landing face-down on the sidewalk.

Most patients in the study weren’t hospitalized, but the researchers said the problem should be taken seriously.

The study involved cases in a U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission database that collects emergency room visit information from about 100 hospitals. The researchers tallied 2,500 patients with cellphone-related head and neck injuries from 1998 through 2017.

The study was published in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology.

Nationwide, they estimated there were about 76,000 people injured during that time. Annual cases totalled fewer than 2,000 until 2006, but increased steeply after that. About 40% of those injured were ages 13 to 29, and many were hurt while walking, texting or driving.

Cellphone use also has been linked with repetitive strain injuries in the hands and neck, and injuries to other parts of the body caused by distracted use.

“I love my smartphone,” Paskhover said, but he added that it’s easy to get too absorbed and avoiding injury requires common sense.

“People wouldn’t walk around reading a magazine,” he said. “Be careful.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

COVID-19 takes 5 more lives in Alberta

Alberta announced five more deaths related to COVID-19 on Monday, almost doubling… Continue reading

Red Deer grateful to Saskatoon police for helping during 9-1-1 outage

Telus Mobility customers had to dial 9-1-1 from a landline before outage was resolved

Federal wage subsidy plan will help businesses say central Alberta business representatives

Prime minister says businesses losing 30 per cent in revenue eligible for 75 per cent wage subsidy

A message from the Advocate publisher

In good times and bad, The Red Deer Advocate has been here… Continue reading

Charitable Red Deer-area fundraisers are postponed or ‘re-imagined’ due to COVID-19

Virtual daffodil sales and some online benefits are planned

Alberta Health Services provides COVID-19 prevention tips

Alberta Health Services has a number of recommendations for people amid the… Continue reading

Alberta government website has latest COVID-19 statistics

Red Deer Advocate readers can stay up to date on the COVID-19… Continue reading

Newspapers are safe to touch, World Health Organization confirms

Just make sure to wash your hands, as you would after touching any surface or object

David Marsden: Signs of kindness lift our spirits during COVID-19 pandemic

From teddy bears, to colourful cutouts of hearts, to expressions of support… Continue reading

Parents should respect custody arrangements during COVID-19 pandemic: Ont. courts

Parents should respect custody arrangements during COVID-19 pandemic: Ont. courts

Canadian military ready to mobilize 24,000 troops for COVID-19: Minister

Canadian military ready to mobilize 24,000 troops for COVID-19: Minister

Vancouver Convention Centre picked for off site COVID-19 treatment centre

Vancouver Convention Centre picked for off site COVID-19 treatment centre

Trump defends extending virus guidelines as spread continues

Trump defends extending virus guidelines as spread continues

Most Read