Family members remember workers who died on the job

A picture of Lynn Cadrain’s son lined a path of remembrance at Bower Ponds on Sunday. Dustin Cadrain, described as a poetry-loving cowboy died far too early.

Steps For Life participants read placards with information about workers killed on the job at Bower Ponds Sunday.

Steps For Life participants read placards with information about workers killed on the job at Bower Ponds Sunday.

A picture of Lynn Cadrain’s son lined a path of remembrance at Bower Ponds on Sunday.

Dustin Cadrain, described as a poetry-loving cowboy died far too early.

In 2004, Cadrain’s chest was crushed by a heavy steel boom while he was working in Alberta’s oilpatch, just two weeks after his 21st birthday.

A government investigation found Cadrain’s employer in violation of at least four safety regulations, directly resulting in his painful death.

Dustin Cadrain’s picture was just one of many, which lined the path in Red Deer’s first Steps For Life event — a charitable walk to support Threads for Life, a national charity which supports families and victims of workplace tragedy.

Family members and friends walked solemnly in bright yellow T-shirts for their fallen sons, daughters, husbands and wives.

The event started at the day of mourning tree, planted almost 20 years ago in remembrance of workers who were fatally injured in workplace incidents.

Lynn Cadrain addressed a crowd of around 50 at the event, her intention she said, was to raise awareness for the victims of workplace accidents and hopefully stop future accidents — especially accidents that could have been prevented, like the one that claimed her son’s life.

“I just want to raise awareness to every single employer, foreman, consultant; from big companies, to individual workers — know that you have rights, know that you are responsible for safety, and that everyone has the right to go home at night,” Cadrain said.

Cadrain said her experience with Threads for Life has been a positive one, and that the charity has been very supportive in helping her get Dustin’s story out.

She recently spoke at an event on workplace safety in Toronto on the charity’s behalf and said she hoped she was reaching young people in particular.

“Younger workers have this attitude that it won’t happen to them; but this is so much more than statistics or a sound bite on the news, they need to know the aftermath goes on forever for the survivors,” Cadrain said.