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Notre Dame High School to host first-ever ND Unified Cougar Classic

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A Red Deer high school will put on an event to bring together students with and without intellectual disabilities through sport.

École Secondaire Notre Dame High School will host the first-ever ND Unified Cougar Classic on Friday, April 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

“This event marks a significant milestone in the mission to foster inclusivity and camaraderie among high school students through sports,” a Red Deer Catholic Regional Schools media release states.

“The ND Unified Cougar Classic will bring together students with and without intellectual disabilities to train and compete side by side, showcasing the true spirit of teamwork and mutual respect.”

Unified Sports teams are composed of athletes (students with intellectual disabilities) and partners (students without intellectual disabilities), promoting an environment of equality and inclusion, the school division’s release explained.

“Each team is carefully assembled to ensure a balance of skills, offering every participant the chance to contribute to their team’s success with their unique abilities.

“This year’s event underscores our commitment to creating a supportive and fun environment where athletes can compete fairly and safely.”

Coaches also play a crucial role in fostering this atmosphere, working tirelessly to ensure that the principles of Unified Sports are upheld in every game and activity, the division added.

“The first annual ND Unified Cougar Classic is not just a competition; it is a celebration of the power of sports to bring people together, breaking down barriers and creating lasting friendships. We are thrilled to have this opportunity to cheer on these remarkable teams as they demonstrate the true meaning of unity and sportsmanship.”



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Sean McIntosh

About the Author: Sean McIntosh

Sean joined the Red Deer Advocate team in the summer of 2017. Originally from Ontario, he worked in a small town of 2,000 in Saskatchewan for seven months before coming to Central Alberta.
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