B.C. city tries to scare Canadian geese away

KELOWNA, B.C. — Canadian geese in one B.C. community aren’t cooked — at least not just yet.

KELOWNA, B.C. — Canadian geese in one B.C. community aren’t cooked — at least not just yet.

The Okanagan city of Kelowna is using scare tactics to try and relocate 50 of the black-headed birds after its kill permit was denied by Environment Canada.

City officials say they applied for the cull because geese droppings are affecting water quality.

But an Environment Canada spokeswoman says it will only consider kill permits when the geese are causing property damage.

John Penwright, Kelowna’s urban forestry supervisor, says the city has come close to shutting down beaches in the past because of bacteria linked to geese droppings.

Penwright says the city is now using dogs, birds of prey, laser lights and blank-shooting pistols to try and get the birds to leave beaches.

Ian Wilson, Kelowna’s parks service manager, says the city has received few complaints about the geese-control tactics.

“Most people seem to recognize that we’re trying to do our job,” he said. “We didn’t have many concerns but there were a few. We do get a lot of complaints about goose feces.”