B.C. rallies against HST

Former British Columbia premier Bill Vander Zalm jumped back into the political spotlight Saturday when he led the biggest of 20 provincewide rallies against the proposed harmonized sales tax.

VANCOUVER — Former British Columbia premier Bill Vander Zalm jumped back into the political spotlight Saturday when he led the biggest of 20 provincewide rallies against the proposed harmonized sales tax.

Vander Zalm, 75, told about over 1,000 people gathered outside a downtown convention centre that the HST will deal a cruel blow to most people while boosting profits for big business.

“It takes from the people, the consumers, particularly those who are packing the lunch bucket, the seniors, the students, the people that can least afford to pay yet another tax and it’s giving it to the big corporations,” Vander Zalm told the rally.

Vander Zalm, who led the Social Credit party from 1986 to 1991, headlined the anti-HST rally in Vancouver and said 19 other communities from Prince George to Victoria were also waging an attack on the tax that the Liberal government will implement next July.

In Vancouver, small business owners and families made up the crowd, many carrying signs including “Don’t bleed us dry”; “More taxes, more lies”; and “Fight the HST.”

Vander Zalm told them they have the power to stop the 12-per-cent HST by putting pressure on Premier Gordon Campbell’s Liberal government, which maintains the tax is being unfairly slammed.

Vander Zalm said he hopes public outrage will lead to a referendum if 10 per cent of voters in each constituency oppose the HST, which is also being implemented in Ontario next July, but at 13 per cent.

“We’ll do whatever it takes and we’ll go from now until election time so that the people won’t forget,” he said to cheers.

The charismatic Vander Zalm resigned as premier in 1991 when a provincial conflict-of-interest report found he had mixed private business with his public office in the sale of his Fantasy Gardens flower business and theme park.

He has only occasionally commented publicly on issues since then, but Saturday’s rally was perhaps his most high-profile appearance in nearly 20 years.

Opposition NDP Leader Carole James joined Vander Zalm and leaders of smaller political parties to say halting the HST will take people from all political stripes to stand together.

James said the Liberals introduced the HST after saying that wouldn’t happen and then failed to consult voters.

“The public is angry at being betrayed by this government and I have to tell you it shows how angry people are when you can get political opponents together,” James said, adding she and Vander Zalm have been on opposite sides on many issues over the years.

James said the vitriol against the HST could eventually force the government to bow to public pressure.

“It will take seven Liberal MLAs to vote against the HST,” she said.

“So I encourage you to get out there. Phone your Liberal MLAs, talk to them, write to them. Tell them to do the right thing.”

The HST combines both the provincial and federal taxes, and the Liberals have tried to sell it as the best way to create jobs and boost B.C.’s economy.

But critics say the merged tax will hurt families because they’ll be paying tax on things that are currently not taxed, including haircuts and restaurant meals.

Kyle Reagan, who came to the rally hoisting a big red “Stop HST” sign in the shape of a stop sign, said his spa business will suffer because people will have to pay more in taxes than is currently the case.

“It’s an area where it’s discretionary income that people are spending their money on,” he said, adding higher costs elsewhere will force people to spend their money on necessities.

He said any benefits for small businesses will be outweighed by fewer customers.

For example, Reagan said he now gets a rebate on the existing five-per-cent federal Goods and Services Tax, but will start recouping 12 per cent when the HST is introduced.

“But the concern I have is that there are so many people upset with this tax that there will be an overall loss of business,” he said.

Just Posted

City of Red Deer gets ball rolling on annexing more land

”It’s important we look ahead,” says Mayor Veer

Walmart melding online and in-store shopping

South Red Deer Walmart recently underwent six months of renovations

Updated: Nature trail unveiled at RDC

Trail unveiling and tree planting honours Nova Chemicals $2 million donation

Rural municipalities seek more funding to address cannabis legalization

Not enough supports in Municipal Cannabis Transition Program

Video: Windows smashed at three Red Deer businesses

Red Deer RCMP arrest man after vandalism spree

Automated cars could kill wide range of jobs, federal documents say

OTTAWA — More than one million jobs could be lost to the… Continue reading

McGill research finds significant driving impairment 5 hours after cannabis use

MONTREAL — Driving under the influence of cannabis remains dangerous even five… Continue reading

Family: Remembering the important things

It seems so much of life is work and routine and then… Continue reading

Canada gets into Women’s World Cup with 7-0 win over Panama

FRISCO, Texas — Christine Sinclair isn’t concerned about chasing records. She’s set… Continue reading

Baldwin urges ‘overthrow’ of Trump government via voting

MANCHESTER, N.H. — Actor Alec Baldwin followed up his latest parody portrayal… Continue reading

Prince Harry and Meghan expecting their 1st child in spring

CANBERRA, Australia — Prince Harry and his wife, the Duchess of Sussex,… Continue reading

Sears files for Chapter 11 amid plunging sales, massive debt

NEW YORK — Sears filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Monday, buckling… Continue reading

Doctors to debate medical pot as more patients expected to ask for prescriptions

VANCOUVER — Doctors with opposing views on whether medical marijuana should be… Continue reading

Most Read