‘Froggy’ looks to Canada to save him

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — Froggy cannot forget the horrific blast.

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — Froggy cannot forget the horrific blast.

It was in early June 2008 as hundreds of Canadian and Afghan soldiers swept through villages in the dangerous Panjwaii district of Kandahar province.

Froggy, as always, was sticking close to the man he calls “my major,” Edmonton-based Maj. Mark Campbell.

“He’s very handsome. He’s very excellent guy. He’s very smart major,” Froggy said.

“There’s a lot of Taliban in this village. So, we start in the morning fighting. We captured the first village, and the Taliban escaped to the other village.”

A six-year medic in the Afghan National Army, Mohammad Rahman, 42, picked up his nickname because of his raspy, throaty voice.

He was initially insulted, he said, until he was assured that another famous frog, presumably Kermit, was a bona fide television star.

Born in Logar province near Kabul, the married father of seven was lured from the Afghan army when a Canadian officer promised him more than the US$300 a month he was earning.

The soldier became an interpreter — a terp — for the Canadian military, guiding officers through the language and cultural maze of southern Afghanistan.

Froggy also treated Campbell when he lost both legs to an IED.

As he finishes his story about that day, Froggy talks about the one thing that scares him: the prospect of the Canadian forces leaving him behind.

His father, who died last month, and other relatives have received a dreaded “night letter” from the Taliban, warning he should quit his interpreter work or face death at their hands.

Froggy is pleading with the Canadian government to grant him and his wife, four daughters and three sons — who range in age from two to 20 years old — entry to Canada.

“How can I live in Afghanisntan?” he said.

“I request from the government of Canada, especially from the Parliament, to think of us, because we are working for Canadians very honestly.”

“Froggy, for me, is much more than an interpreter,” said Maj. Andrew Vivian, who eventually took over Campbell’s job. “He is my own personal cultural adviser.”

Just Posted

N.S. senior whose birthday card request drew international response dies

SYDNEY, N.S. — A Nova Scotia widower who received thousands of birthday… Continue reading

Freedom of expression or personal attack? Nurse appeals fine for Facebook post

REGINA — Saskatchewan’s highest court is to decide what’s next for a… Continue reading

RCMP commissioner says info in FBI probe led to arrest of intelligence director

OTTAWA — An RCMP employee charged with trying to disclose secret information… Continue reading

NDP’s Singh seeks urban support with housing billions, avoids deficit questions

OTTAWA — Jagmeet Singh continued his push to win progressive votes on… Continue reading

B.C. won’t use court ruling as tactic in pipeline battle: environment minister

VANCOUVER — Environment Minister George Heyman says British Columbia can’t stop the… Continue reading

WATCH: 2019 Canada Winter Games will leave a lasting legacy, say organizers

It leaves Red Deer with the infrastructure and confidence to host future such events

Your community calendar

Wednesday Central Alberta Historical Society annual general meeting is 6 p.m. at… Continue reading

N.S. senior whose birthday card request drew international response dies

SYDNEY, N.S. — A Nova Scotia widower who received thousands of birthday… Continue reading

Freedom of expression or personal attack? Nurse appeals fine for Facebook post

REGINA — Saskatchewan’s highest court is to decide what’s next for a… Continue reading

RCMP commissioner says info in FBI probe led to arrest of intelligence director

OTTAWA — An RCMP employee charged with trying to disclose secret information… Continue reading

NDP’s Singh seeks urban support with housing billions, avoids deficit questions

OTTAWA — Jagmeet Singh continued his push to win progressive votes on… Continue reading

B.C. won’t use court ruling as tactic in pipeline battle: environment minister

VANCOUVER — Environment Minister George Heyman says British Columbia can’t stop the… Continue reading

Parties spar over what is best for parental benefits

OTTAWA — Is it better to be paid in credit or with… Continue reading

Alberta spends $3M for 30 nurse practitioners for remote, specialized areas

Province spends $3M for 30 nurse practitioners for remote, specialized areas EDMONTON… Continue reading

Most Read