Garbage stinks as Toronto strike continues

Family parks have become makeshift dumping grounds, irate residents are facing off against each other and tourists are thinking twice about the pristine place called Toronto as the most populous city in Canada enters into its second week of a stinky summertime strike.

TORONTO — Family parks have become makeshift dumping grounds, irate residents are facing off against each other and tourists are thinking twice about the pristine place called Toronto as the most populous city in Canada enters into its second week of a stinky summertime strike.

About 24,000 inside and outside municipal workers walked of the job June 22, bringing garbage pickup to a halt and closing city-run daycares, parks and recreation programs, swimming pools and ferry service.

A key issue for workers is pay for unused sick days, a benefit the city said it can no longer afford.

On Sunday, residents had some reprieve from the pungent smell of rotting refuse as rain and cooler temperatures masked the stench.

But that didn’t calm the concerns of a furious community living across the street from a temporary dump site set up by the city west of the downtown core.

“It’s really stinky and there’s children everywhere and I have to sit through it and people are taking to it so easily. They’re just going there and dumping it,” said Sarah Beals, who lives near the basketball-court-turned-dumping-ground.

“It’s out of sight and out of mind,” she added, grimacing at the street lined with car loads full of people ready to toss their trash.

The location, Christie Pits Park, is blocks of grassy land and home to little league games, walking paths and a swimming pool.

Residents have erected prominent, colourful signs declaring that the area is “our park not a dump,” and have confronted people pulling wagons filled with litter and driving pickup trucks stuffed with rotting rubbish.

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