Halfway house stays relaxed for Sask. man convicted in mercy killing of daughter

A Saskatchewan man serving a life sentence for killing his disabled daughter has won his bid for looser parole conditions.

ABBOTSFORD, B.C. — A Saskatchewan man serving a life sentence for killing his disabled daughter has won his bid for looser parole conditions.

The National Parole Board says Robert Latimer can now spend five days a week away from a halfway house in Victoria where he’s been living for two years.

The 56-year-old farmer has been spending five nights a week at the house and two in his Victoria apartment.

The decision comes after a Federal Court judge ordered the parole board last month to revisit an earlier decision denying an expansion of day parole.

The board had said that it could only expand Latimer’s parole under “exceptional circumstances” and found that his case did not meet that threshold.

Latimer was convicted of second-degree murder in the death of his severely disabled daughter, Tracy — an act he described as a mercy killing.