Oilsands security in doubt?

While the oilsands industry tries to calm any frayed nerves after a splashy protest by Greenpeace at a Shell work site in northern Alberta, some analysts say the infiltration of such a huge operation should serve as a warning about the security of energy installations.

EDMONTON — While the oilsands industry tries to calm any frayed nerves after a splashy protest by Greenpeace at a Shell work site in northern Alberta, some analysts say the infiltration of such a huge operation should serve as a warning about the security of energy installations.

If demonstrators can get into the site, so could terrorists intent on doing real damage, says Tom Flanagan, a University of Calgary political science professor and author of a report about groups opposed to development of Western Canada’s resource sector.

“It does raise concerns,” Flanagan says. “It would be wise to take this as a warning of the importance of reviewing procedures to make sure this kind of thing couldn’t happen again.”

About two dozen protesters from Canada, the United States and France gained access to Shell’s (NYSE:RDS.D) Muskeg River mine site north of Fort McMurray, last Tuesday, chaining themselves to giant dump trucks and a four-storey-tall shovel that scoops oily sand from the bottom of a massive pit.

After unfurling a banner which read, “Tarsands: Climate Crime” and spending 31 hours at the mine, the protesters left the fenced and gated site without any charges laid.

Fred Lindsay, Alberta’s solicitor general and minister of public security, says he’d also like to know how the Greenpeace protesters gained access to the tightly controlled site.

But he notes that Alberta’s energy infrastructure is spread over a vast area and not all incidents can be prevented.

“You look at the amount of infrastructure we have in this province, the large resource developments and the miles and miles of pipeline — obviously we can’t fence it all in,” Lindsay says.

“This particular case with Greenpeace has turned out to be a publicity stunt but nonetheless, they gained access which created safety concerns for them as well as the site. So we’re going to mark that to see what we can do to make those sites more secure.”

The province watches for any possible terrorist threats and has counter-terrorism protocols in place.

Canada has a stable political climate and has few violent incidents directed at the resource sector. Lindsay doesn’t expect this latest incident will affect the country’s reputation as a secure supplier of energy.

Toronto-based security analyst Mercedes Stephenson says the Greenpeace action likely took time to plan and noted that the group specializes in such actions.

“I was surprised they got into the facility… but it’s Greenpeace,” Stephenson says. “It has a history of being able to get into all kinds of places that nobody expects them to be able to.”

Oilsands operations likely wouldn’t be the first target of terrorists determined to halt the flow of oil or gas from Alberta, she says.

It’s more likely those groups would choose a vulnerable area along the thousands of kilometres of pipelines that snake across the province.

In recent months pipelines in northeastern British Columbia owned by EnCana Corp. (TSX:ECA) have been the target of explosions and police have yet to make any arrests.

“If somebody really wanted to do damage, they probably wouldn’t go to an oilsands mining facility,” Stephenson says. “You’d be far more effective if you actually disrupted the flow. Because the flow is what supplying energy.”

Alberta’s oilsands currently produce about 1.2 million barrels per day and the United States has called the Canadian oilsands “critically important” to energy security in North America.

Shell hasn’t determined where the Greenpeace protesters gained access to the mine.

Paul Hagel, a spokesman for Shell Canada, says the incident has prompted a full-scale security review which includes its adjacent Albian Sands site.

“We’re talking about 155,000 barrel a day operation and so obviously, to ensure the future security of it is paramount,” Hagel says.

Just Posted

Cannabis legalization won’t impact one Red Deer pot dispensary

Nothing changes for Compass Cannabis Clinic in Red Deer despite legalization

Cannabis retail store will open later in October in Red Deer

Two cannabis stores coming to downtown Red Deer

Neighbours drop opposition to Red Deer County communications tower

Communication tower to be located in Balmoral Heights

Legal cannabis comes with many unknowns: Red Deer County councillors

Councillors question how rural municipalities will be able to enforce cannabis regulations

Kitten season puts pressure on Red Deer shelter

More public education needed to control cat population

WATCH: Two weeks away from Canadian Finals Rodeo in Red Deer

In just two weeks, Ponoka’s Shayna Weir will compete with the best… Continue reading

Wickenheiser, Pegula reflect NHL’s trend toward diversity

BUFFALO, N.Y. — With a laugh, Kim Pegula’s competitive nature kicked in… Continue reading

Harry and Meghan bring rain to drought-stricken Outback town

DUBBO, Australia — The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were jokingly thanked… Continue reading

TV Review: A Roseanne Barr-less ‘The Conners’ is a triumph

NEW YORK — Can there be a “Roseanne” without Roseanne? The answer… Continue reading

Canadian manufacturing sales fell 0.4 per cent in August: Statistics Canada

OTTAWA — Statistics Canada says manufacturing sales fell 0.4 per cent to… Continue reading

Brian Mulroney joins board of directors of New York-based pot company

NEW YORK — Former prime minister Brian Mulroney is joining the board… Continue reading

Canadians waking up to legalized cannabis: ‘My new dealer is the prime minister’

ST. JOHN’S, N.L. — Canadians across the country woke up to legalized… Continue reading

B.C. man accused of swimming naked in Toronto shark tank arrested in Thunder Bay

THUNDER BAY, Ont. — Police have arrested a B.C. man who is… Continue reading

‘Start low, go slow’: Experts walk bud beginners through cannabis 101

With the countdown to cannabis legalization Wednesday ticking towards 4-20, some novice… Continue reading

Most Read