Six Nations say no to run

Aboriginal protesters vowing to stop the Olympic torch from entering their southern Ontario reserve are gathering at the Six Nations boundary line.

SIX NATIONS INDIAN RESERVE, Ont. — Aboriginal protesters vowing to stop the Olympic torch from entering their southern Ontario reserve are gathering at the Six Nations boundary line.

Some 20 vehicles are parked on the side of the road leading into the reserve and protesters are flying Mohawk Warrior and Iroquois Confederacy flags.

The protesters say the Olympic flame has no place on native land.

Six Nations leaders who support the torch run had planned to hold a relay through the reserve but switched gears today and limited the celebrations to the reserve’s bingo hall in the face of the protest.

Protester Missy Elliott says getting the band leadership to change the celebration was a huge victory for the Olympic torch protest movement.

Members of the Six Nations reserve are also involved in a land dispute over a former housing development on the outskirts of Caledonia.

The land has been occupied by Six Nations protesters since February 2006 and has been the site of a number of violent confrontations between aboriginals and town residents.

The band leadership says the torch will be driven directly to the reserve’s bingo hall and the relay involving some two dozen runners will take place on the hall’s property around 5 p.m.

“It’s the first time where any person who has stood up against these torch and Olympics has actually had a success in being able to move the celebration,” Elliott said.

“Different protesters have been able to hold it off for an hour or some time but it’s never been moved so this is a huge significance.”

The protesters say participating in the relay plays into what they say is Canada’s attempt to hide the negative image the country has on the world stage over its treatment of aboriginals.

A reserve official would not comment on whether RCMP or Ontario Provincial Police officers would enter the reserve with the torch.

On Dec. 8, the Vancouver Olympic organizing committee agreed to drop the usual RCMP escort for the Olympic flame as it passed through a Mohawk reserve. Games organizers made the concession after a flurry of negotiations with community members who were upset by the prospect of a non-aboriginal police force patrolling their territory.

The agreement allowed the flame to pass through a community that played a role in the Oka crisis, a tense summer-long standoff between aboriginals and police in 1990.

Last Thursday, about 100 protesters who rang bells, drummed and chanted “No Olympics on Stolen Native Land,” took over one intersection in Toronto, forcing organizers to change the torch route.

There was a similar protest during Montreal’s torch run a week earlier.

Just Posted

Blood donations needed in Central Alberta: Canadian Blood Services

357 donors are needed before Aug. 26 at the Red Deer clinic

Photos: Smoky conditions in Red Deer

Red Deer and area is experiencing high risk air quality.See related: Red… Continue reading

PHOTO: Rainbow Block Party at Red Deer’s West Park

The Trans and Non-Binary Aid Society hosted a Rainbow Block Party at… Continue reading

WATCH: Red Deer man shaves beard for Mustard Seed

‘I have spent 30 years of my life being addicted to both alcohol and drugs’

US newspapers to Trump: We’re not enemies of the people

NEW YORK — Newspapers from Maine to Hawaii pushed back against President… Continue reading

Liberal MP Iqra Khalid accused of giving award to purveyor of anti-Semitism

OTTAWA — A Liberal MP is under fire for presenting a ”certificate… Continue reading

Ottawa intervenes to get 13-year-old ball player to Little League World Series

OTTAWA — Thirteen-year-old Dio Gama will get to play baseball in the… Continue reading

Esther, celebrity ‘wonder pig,’ diagnosed with cancer after CT scan

GUELPH, Ont. — A celebrity pig whose owners raised more than half… Continue reading

Feds preparing response in case Trump follows through on auto tariff threat

OTTAWA — With threats of devastating U.S. tariffs hanging over the auto… Continue reading

Committee to decide how millions in Humboldt Broncos donations are split

SASKATOON — Lawyers for the families of some of those who died… Continue reading

Boy, 11, dies after being struck by payloader on southern Alberta ranch

BOW ISLAND, Alta. — A boy has died after an accident on… Continue reading

Liberals look at creating federal holiday to mark legacy of residential schools

OTTAWA — The federal Liberal government wants to establish a holiday to… Continue reading

Most Read


Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $185 for 260 issues (must live in delivery area to qualify) Unlimited Digital Access 99 cents for the first four weeks and then only $15 per month Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $15 a month