Two more men charged in B.C. rave rape

The teenage girl whose alleged rape at a B.C. rave was photographed with cellphones and posted online by witnesses says she’s had to leave school because of bullying.

MAPLE RIDGE, B.C. — The teenage girl whose alleged rape at a B.C. rave was photographed with cellphones and posted online by witnesses says she’s had to leave school because of bullying.

RCMP announced Thursday that two more men have been charged in the Sept. 10 incident involving the 16-year-old girl.

Colton Ashton McMorris, 18, of Maple Ridge has now been charged with sexual assault and Dennis John Allen Warrington, 19, of Langley has been charged with production and distribution of child pornography. Another 16-year-old boy was charged last fall with production and distribution of child pornography.

Sgt. Peter Thiessen said Thursday that investigators don’t anticipate any further charges in the case at this point, adding that officers hope the charges that have been laid bring some measure of closure to the girl and her family.

The teen thanked those who have offered her support “through this terrible ordeal.”

“To the people who did not support me, who called me names, who spread lies about me, thank you because you made me much stronger than I’ve ever been before,” she wrote.

Her parents said in a separate statement: “Our daughter has been bullied and therefore has had to leave school. Hopefully these charges will help to prevent any more attacks on her character.”

Thiessen said police still feel there was more than one suspect involved in the alleged sexual assault. When the incident first happened, police said the girl had been raped by multiple men.

“The information that we received from witnesses, statements that we received clearly indicated in our minds that that was the case. However, bringing that before the courts is a whole other issue and obtaining the appropriate evidence to support those charges,” Thiessen told reporters.

“At this point, we don’t have the evidence to support the allegations and the statements and the information we have in regards to further charges.”

The shocking case made headlines across the country after photos of the incident began to appear on Facebook and other social media websites, and some party-goers insisted the girl, who police have said they believe had been drugged, was a willing participant.

Thiessen said Thursday that toxicology tests performed 18 to 20 hours after the incident were negative for alcohol or any drug, but pointed out “that testing was upwards 20 hours after the alleged incident.”

There has been a “code of silence” among the teenage witnesses, he said, and investigators have had a difficult time getting witnesses to co-operate.

“There are individuals out there that we feel played a significant role in this. They know who they are. We have spoken to those individuals. They do have an opportunity to clear themselves if they choose to. They have not chosen to,” he said.

Thiessen said the file isn’t closed.