Burman University will receive $98,000 in funding for its new finance and entrepreneurship program, the Government of Alberta announced in a statement on Friday. (Contributed photo)

Burman University will receive $98,000 in funding for its new finance and entrepreneurship program, the Government of Alberta announced in a statement on Friday. (Contributed photo)

Alberta funding new micro-credential program at Burman University in Lacombe

Institution will receive $98,000 in funding for new finance and entrepreneurship program

The provincial government is funding five new micro-credential programs, including one at a post-secondary institution in central Alberta.

Earlier this fall, Alberta’s government invested $8 million over two years to create 69 new micro-credentials programs through the Alberta at Work initiative. Additional funding of more than $270,000 will help create five new programs that support key sectors, including energy, technology, software development and finance.

Burman University will receive $98,000 in funding for its new finance and entrepreneurship program, the Government of Alberta announced in a statement on Friday.

“Burman University is pleased to participate in advancing the Alberta 2030: Building Skills for Jobs strategy by providing micro-credentials in the areas of finance and entrepreneurship,” said Loren Agrey, Burman University president.

“Individuals with an interest in these short-term learning programs will be able to benefit from them in central Alberta and, in turn, be able to contribute with the needed skills for our economy.”

The other four new programs will be offered at Keyano College, Lethbridge College and Southern Alberta Institute of Technology.

The provincial government describes micro-credentials as short-term, documented learning experiences that recognize specific skills and competencies and create new opportunities for unemployed and underemployed Albertans to quickly re-skill or upskill to better meet industry needs, re-enter the workforce and quickly pivot in their careers.

Minister of Advanced Education Demetrios Nicolaides said he’s pleased the funding for five additional micro-credential programs could be delivered before the end of the fiscal year.

“These unique opportunities allow Albertans to develop the job-ready skills they need to be successful and build new careers while building up the workforce in high-demand sectors,” said Nicolaides.

David Eggen, NDP critic for advanced education, said the UCP is “making it more difficult” for Albertans to advance their education or seek career training.

“They have instituted devastating cuts, resulting in Alberta having the highest tuition increases in the country,” Eggen said in a statement.

“The Alberta NDP supports micro-credential programs, but the program is a tiny fraction of the $690 million worth of cuts they have imposed on post-secondary schools.”



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