Alberta’s final crop report of this year’s growing season indicated yields were about 10 per cent above the five-year average. (Advocate file photo)

Alberta’s final crop report of this year’s growing season indicated yields were about 10 per cent above the five-year average. (Advocate file photo)

Alberta’s 2022 harvest results in above-average yield, says provincial government

Farmers were two to three weeks ahead in harvest progress for second straight year

The 2022 harvest has resulted in above-average yields for Alberta farmers, says the provincial government.

Alberta’s final crop report of this year’s growing season indicated yields were about 10 per cent above the five-year average.

Due to favourable conditions early on in the growing season, farmers across the province were two to three weeks ahead in harvest progress for the second straight year.

“Alberta’s producers have faced a number of challenges over the years, but through their hard work and dedication, continue to show the immense value of the agriculture sector and the contributions this industry makes to our economy and communities,” said Nate Horner, minister of agriculture and irrigation.

As of Oct. 11, the date of the final crop report, about 99 per cent of all crops had been harvested two to three weeks ahead of the five-year average.

Dryland yields for the central region, as well as the northeast region, were estimated at nine and eight per cent above the five-year averages.

Alberta’s south region had the highest yields at 18 per cent above the five-year average, followed by the Peace region, where yields were 12 per cent above the average.

Provincially, about 94 per cent of hard red spring wheat and 78 per cent of durum wheat are grading in the top two grades. Meanwhile about 34 per cent of barley is eligible for malt and 54 per cent is grading as No. 1 feed.

Overall, quality for hard red spring wheat, canola and dry peas was above their five-year averages, while durum wheat and oats was lower. Quality for malt and feed barley was on par with the five-year average.

Soil moisture reserves declined due to dry conditions in late summer and fall. As of Oct. 11, surface soil moisture was rated as 40 per cent poor, 32 per cent fair, 27 per cent good and one per cent excellent. However, it is anticipated that soil moisture reserves and surface water supplies will build up to an acceptable level before the 2023 growing season, according to the provincial government.



sean.mcintosh@reddeeradvocate.com

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