Australian leader says siege gunman was dropped off nation’s security watch list years ago

The gunman responsible for a deadly siege in a Sydney cafe was once on the national security agency's watch list, but was dropped off it years ago for reasons that remain unclear, Australia's prime minister said Wednesday.

SYDNEY, Australia — The gunman responsible for a deadly siege in a Sydney cafe was once on the national security agency’s watch list, but was dropped off it years ago for reasons that remain unclear, Australia’s prime minister said Wednesday.

Man Haron Monis, a 50-year-old Iranian-born, self-styled cleric described by Prime Minister Tony Abbott as deeply disturbed, took 17 people hostage inside a downtown Sydney cafe on Monday. Sixteen hours later, the siege ended in a barrage of gunfire when police rushed in to free the captives. Two hostages were killed along with Monis.

Abbott said Monis was on the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation’s watch list in 2008 and 2009, but was later dropped from it. The agency was watching Monis because he had sent a series of offensive letters to the families of dead Australian soldiers, Abbott said.

“I don’t know why he dropped off the watch list in those days, I really don’t,” Abbott told reporters.

Monis was convicted and sentenced last year to 300 hours of community service for sending what a judge called “grossly offensive” letters to families of soldiers killed in Afghanistan between 2007 and 2009. He later was charged with being an accessory to the murder of his ex-wife. Earlier this year, he was charged in the 2002 sexual assault of a woman. He had been out on bail on all the charges.

“We particularly need to know how someone with such a long record of violence and such a long record of mental instability was out on bail after his involvement in a particularly horrific crime,” Abbott said.

Abbott promised a transparent investigation and the government was expected to release a report in January looking into all aspects of the siege.

Just three days before Monis began his deadly rampage, Australia’s highest court refused to hear his appeal of the convictions for sending the letters.

The next business day, a shotgun-wielding Monis walked into the cafe, just a short stroll from the courtroom where the ruling was delivered.

Channel Seven cameraman Greg Parker witnessed the siege from the network’s studios, which are located opposite the cafe. The network broadcast live video from the scene until police asked that they cut the feed. The cameraman said in an interview with the network on Wednesday that a police sniper soon joined him, as he had the perfect vantage point to see through the cafe’s windows.

As the siege dragged into the night, Parker said Monis grew visibly agitated, shoving the hostages and positioning them between himself and the windows. When a gunshot rang out just after 2 a.m., the sniper said, “Window two, hostage down,” prompting police to storm the cafe.

“If they hadn’t have moved when they moved this could have been much, much worse,” said New South Wales state police Commissioner Andrew Scipione.

Scipione said police had asked that Monis not be granted bail, but the court ruled otherwise. Asked why Monis was not on any national security watch list, Scipione noted that the charges Monis faced were not politically motivated.

Thousands of tearful Australians continued to pour into Martin Place on Wednesday, a plaza in the heart of Sydney’s financial and shopping district where the Lindt cafe is located. A makeshift memorial had grown into a mountain of flowers left to honour the hostages killed: Katrina Dawson, a 38-year-old lawyer and mother of three, and Tori Johnson, the cafe’s 34-year-old manager. Officials have not said if the two died in crossfire as police stormed in or were shot by their captor.

Bouquets were also attached to the police barricades that surround the cafe, along with an Australian flag emblazoned with the words, “Vale Tori Johnson” and “Hero,” a nod to reports that Johnson brought the standoff to an end by grabbing Monis’ shotgun, saving the lives of most of his fellow hostages.

Monis grew up in Iran as Mohammad Hassan Manteghi. In 1996, he established a travel agency but took his clients’ money and fled, Iran’s police chief, Gen. Ismail Ahmadi Moghaddam, told the country’s official IRNA news agency Tuesday. Australia accepted him as a refugee around that time.

The police chief said Iran tried to have Monis extradited from Australia in 2000, but that it didn’t happen because Iran and Australia don’t have an extradition agreement.

Abbott said he wanted to know how Monis had been granted permanent residency and why he had been receiving welfare benefits for years, despite being able-bodied, “if not necessarily of sound mind.”

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