Bill’s terrorist propaganda provisions overly broad: law professors

A new analysis says a federal proposal to scrub terrorist propaganda from the Internet risks sweeping in too much speech that has no ties to violent threats.

OTTAWA — A new analysis says a federal proposal to scrub terrorist propaganda from the Internet risks sweeping in too much speech that has no ties to violent threats.

Law professors Craig Forcese and Kent Roach say the definition of propaganda in the government anti-terrorism bill is dangerously broad.

The bill, introduced late last month, proposes giving the RCMP power to seek a judge’s order to remove terrorist propaganda from the Internet.

In a paper released today, Forcese and Roach say while they support the idea in principle, it should be rooted in actual or threatened violence.

The Conservatives brought in the bill — which would also significantly expand the powers of Canada’s spy agency — following the daylight murders of two Canadian soldiers last October.

It is expected to pass second reading in the House of Commons later today.