COVID steps to be eased in May

More details including dates to come later in the week, says Premier Jason Kenney

Premier Jason Kenney says some aspects of the provincial economy will open in May.

“I do hope we’ll be able to begin reopening social and economical aspects of life that have currently been suspended,” said Kenney on Tuesday.

More details on the phased relaunch strategy, including dates, will be revealed later this week. The strategy will be similar to Saskatchewan’s relaunch approach.

“Similar, but not identical,” said Kenney.

“Some of this we’re going to have to make final decisions as we get closer to them, based on how well we do,” Kenney explained.

“Hopefully, we’ve contained recent outbreaks. We’re going to have to monitor those very closely, monitor the other key points of data.”

Alberta confirmed 154 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday, bringing the provincial total to 4,850.

Officials confirmed five new deaths, bringing the provincial deaths due to the novel coronavirus to 80.

Red Deer remains at five active COVID-19 cases, just as it was Monday. The city has experienced 35 cases of the virus, with 30 recovered.

As of Tuesday, about 1,800 people have recovered in the province.

Kenney said there are 82 people hospitalized due to COVID-19, as of Tuesday, and, of those, 21 are in intensive care.

“The number of hospitalizations and ICU admissions remain well below the levels that were modelled (about three weeks ago),” he said.

The collective efforts of Albertans – who are dutifully following public health measures – is working, he said, adding the province needs to continue to remain vigilant.

“The health-care system continues to be able, very capably, to manage the impact of COVID-19,” Kenney said.

The government has introduced a new “low” modelling scenario, estimating 298 Albertans will require hospitalization and 95 will require critical care when the virus reaches its peak.

“If current trends continue, this scenario will become the most likely scenario for Alberta, and let’s hope that is the case,” said Kenney.

The premier said the province is experiencing lower hospitalization rates, compared to other jurisdictions, due to a younger population and a high testing rate.

The high rate of testing means there is a higher proportion of confirmed cases with relatively weak symptoms, that do not require acute or critical care in hospitals, he explained.

Government officials continue to watch hospitalization numbers, intensive care unit capacity and the rate of growth in COVID-19 cases.

Updated modelling scenarios continue to estimate that Alberta’s outbreak will reach its peak in late May. However, the number of Albertans hospitalized at the peak of the virus is predicted to be lower than originally estimated.

The updated probable scenario estimates 596 people will require hospitalization when the virus reaches its peak – a reduction from the previous planning scenario, which pegged the number at 818.

This scenario estimates 190 people will require critical care in ICUs when the virus reaches its peak, compared to the previous number of 232.

“It is essential Albertans continue to exercise common sense and follow public health guidance so we can get the economy moving again as quickly as possible,” Kenney said.



mamta.lulla@reddeeradvocate.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alberta discussing early Stage 2 economic relaunch

Nineteen new COVID-19 cases confirmed by government Wednesday

Red Deer city council defeats bylaw that would have expanded cannabis sales locations

Sixty possible locations would be “overkill,” says Coun. Lawrence Lee

Traffic delays in Red Deer are caused by sidewalk construction

Drivers are urged to slow down near 32nd Street and Taylor Drive

COVID-19 crushing longtime family-owned guide outfitter

What was once a thriving business has all but dried up. Steve… Continue reading

Solidarity together: Central Albertans protest in Red Deer against racism

There’s no such thing as a little bit of racism. Even one… Continue reading

Hydroxychloroquine does not prevent COVID after exposure to the virus: study

Hydroxychloroquine does not prevent COVID after exposure to the virus: study

Nunavut RCMP to consider body cameras as tension between police, Inuit grows

Nunavut RCMP to consider body cameras as tension between police, Inuit grows

Stockwell Day steps down from several roles after comments about racism

Stockwell Day steps down from several roles after comments about racism

Trudeau to join global COVID-19 vaccine fundraiser amid calls for fair access

Trudeau to join global COVID-19 vaccine fundraiser amid calls for fair access

Joint inquiry or review of mass killing taking shape, N.S. justice minister says

Joint inquiry or review of mass killing taking shape, N.S. justice minister says

Greens likely to hold virtual leadership convention due to pandemic: May

Greens likely to hold virtual leadership convention due to pandemic: May

Meng hearing schedule to expand; lawyers ask for ‘referee’ in case

Meng hearing schedule to expand; lawyers ask for ‘referee’ in case

As some protesters in D.C. gird for battle, others provide first aid, supplies

As some protesters in D.C. gird for battle, others provide first aid, supplies

Most Read