British economy grows more than expected after Brexit vote

Experts warn figures do not yet reflect looming nevative impacts

LONDON — Britain’s economy grew faster than expected in the three months after its vote to leave the European Union despite concern that uncertainty over the country’s future would weigh on business.

The figures, however, are preliminary and experts warn they do not yet reflect some of the looming negative impacts, such as an expected rise in inflation.

The Office of National Statistics said Thursday that the economy grew by a quarterly rate of 0.5 per cent in the July-September period thanks mainly to the services sector.

The figure is down from the previous quarter’s 0.7 per cent growth but beat forecasts for 0.3 per cent. It’s is likely to dampen expectations that the Bank of England might offer more stimulus soon.

The data is important in that it is the most comprehensive reading since the June 23 vote.

“The economy has continued to expand at a rate broadly similar to that seen since 2015 and there is little evidence of a pronounced effect in the immediate aftermath of the vote,” said Joe Grice, the statistics agency’s chief economist. “A strong performance in the dominant services industries continued to offset further falls in construction, while manufacturing continued to be broadly flat.”

Analysts had feared the economy would to grind to a halt or even contract after the vote, which has seen some business activity take a substantial hit. The pound has plunged, an indication of investor concern about the country. But the weaker currency also helps British exporters and encouraged spending by tourists.

Treasury chief Philip Hammond appeared relieved that the economy was showing resilience. He travelled to Southampton’s port Thursday to underscore the “outward-facing and globally connected nature of our economy.”

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