Canadian journalist Mohamed Fahmy pardoned by president in Egypt

Nearly two years after his arrest in Egypt on widely denounced terrorism charges, Canadian journalist Mohamed Fahmy walked out of prison a free man Wednesday following a presidential pardon.

Nearly two years after his arrest in Egypt on widely denounced terrorism charges, Canadian journalist Mohamed Fahmy walked out of prison a free man Wednesday following a presidential pardon.

Fahmy and his colleague and co-accused Baher Mohamed were among 100 people — including dozens of prominent human rights activists — pardoned by President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi.

“I am free! This time for real! Cops dropped me at CAC my old high school in my prison garb. Party Time! .FreeAJStaff” Fahmy tweeted moments after his release.

Speaking later to reporters, Fahmy said he still “can’t believe it.”

“We have not digested the fact that we are free, we don’t have to worry about anything else,” he said. “Our families have suffered so much since the beginning of this trial and we’re very happy that el-Sissi took this action and released us.”

His wife, Marwa Omara, said she was visiting Fahmy in prison when she learned the news of his pardon from a TV set that was on.

“I was scared for his health from too much joy,” she said, adding that the first thing they plan to do is have a large wedding party to celebrate their recent marriage.

Fahmy’s lawyer said she was delighted that he was finally free.

“It has been a long ordeal, and we are grateful to President Sissi for exercising his power to pardon the two journalists,” Amal Clooney said in a statement.

“This is a historic day in Egypt where the government has finally corrected a long-standing injustice, and set two innocent men free”.

An emailed statement from the Egyptian president’s office said the pardons were given to people “who have received final prison verdicts in cases related to breaking a protest law or infringing on the police forces’ actions, in addition to a number of health-related and humanitarian cases.”

The pardon also came a day before el-Sissi is to travel to New York to attend the United Nations General Assembly.

Fahmy was given a three-year sentence last month after his second trial — an outcome that shocked international observers.

The 41-year-old’s troubles began in December 2013 when he was working as the Cairo bureau chief for Qatar-based satellite news broadcaster Al Jazeera English.

He and two colleagues were abruptly arrested and charged with a slew of offences, including supporting a banned organization and with fabricating footage to undermine the country’s national security.

The trio maintained their innocence throughout, saying they were just doing their jobs, but after a trial that was internationally decried as a sham, they were found guilty and sentenced to prison terms.

An appeal of their convictions resulted in a second trial, although one of them, Australian Peter Greste, was abruptly deported under a law which allows for the deportation of foreign nationals convicted of crimes.

Fahmy gave up his Egyptian citizenship while behind bars in the hopes that he could follow the same path, but that didn’t happen.

He and his other colleague, Egyptian Baher Mohamed, were, however, granted bail during their retrial, which culminated in last month’s surprising verdict.

Following the verdict, Ottawa had formally asked Egypt’s president to pardon Fahmy or allow his deportation to Canada.

The federal government said it welcomed Wednesday’s developments.

“Canada is pleased that Egyptian President el-Sisi has granted Mr. Fahmy a pardon,” said a spokeswoman with the department of foreign affairs. “We look forward to Mr. Fahmy reuniting with his family and loved ones, and his return to Canada.”

The court that convicted Fahmy said he and his colleagues were, by default, members of the banned Muslim Brotherhood group — considered a terrorist organization by Egypt — because their employer, Al Jazeera, “dedicated its broadcasting to the service and support of the Muslim Brotherhood faction.”

Al Jazeera is owned by Qatar, which has had a tense relationship with Egypt ever since the Egyptian military ousted the country’s former president Mohamed Morsi amid massive protests. Qatar is a strong backer of Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood.

Al-Jazeera did not immediately respond to a request for comment Wednesday, but the network said in a report on its English-language website that it “continues to demand all charges and sentences against its journalists are dropped” despite plans to release the two journalists.

The Committee to Protect Journalists welcomed the journalist’s pardons.

“But this is just a first step,” the CPJ statement said. “Egypt can begin tackling its shameful record of press freedom by releasing all journalists imprisoned for their work in the country.”

Fahmy moved to Canada with his family in 1991, living in Montreal and Vancouver for years before eventually moving abroad for work, which included covering stories for the New York Times and CNN.

Once he leaves Egypt, Fahmy has said he plans to take up a position as an adjunct professor at the University of British Columbia’s school of journalism in Vancouver. He is also writing a book about his experiences.

Just Posted

Alberta’a chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said Thursday that there are more than 328,000 vaccine appointments booked over the next seven days. (Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
Alberta surpasses 2 million doses administered of COVID-19 vaccine

Red Deer down to 835 active cases of COVID-19

RCMP file photo (Photo by Jeff Stokoe/Advocate staff)
RCMP investigating shooting near Maskwacis

Maskwacis and Wetaskiwin RCMP are seeking public assistance after a shooting has… Continue reading

Alberta has made a more detailed framework for those looking to acquire an exemption to the mandatory indoor mask bylaw. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
Alberta changes requirements for mask exemptions

Masks wearing has been recommended for almost a year and provincially mandated… Continue reading

Red Deer Public Schools is projecting a $4-million budget deficit for 2021-22 school year. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Red Deer Public Schools prepares $124-million budget

$1 million COVID recovery plan to assist students

(Black Press file photo).
Central Alberta’s ‘screen-based storytellers’ can apply for $5,000 grants

Calling all filmmakers, gamers, educators, and videographers… TELUS STORYHIVE released its first… Continue reading

Bo’s Bar and Grill owner Brennen Wowk said the hospitality industry is looking for more clarity from the province around what conditions must be met to allow for restaurants reopening. (Advocate file photo)
Frustated restaurant owners want to know government’s reopening plan

Restaurant owners feel they are in lockdown limbo

A man wearing a mask walks out of a Canadian Tire store in Toronto on Wednesday March 18, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Demand for bikes and barbecues ratchets up Canadian Tire’s profit and sales

Demand for bikes and barbecues ratchets up Canadian Tire’s profit and sales

A man works in the broadcast centre at the TMX Group Ltd. in Toronto, on May 9, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese
North American stock markets rebound from three-day losses; loonie falls

North American stock markets rebound from three-day losses; loonie falls

The symbol for Aurora Cannabis appears above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange as the Canadian company lists on October 23, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Richard Drew
Aurora Cannabis reports $164.7 million loss in Q3, launches cost efficiencies plan

Aurora Cannabis reports $164.7 million loss in Q3, launches cost efficiencies plan

Adam Feller reacts as he gets his Pfizer-BioNTech shot at a COVID-19 vaccination clinic on Thursday, May 13, 2021, in Montreal. Quebec has become the latest province to stop giving Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 shot as a first dose.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Ontario keeps stay-at-home order; Quebec pauses Oxford-AstraZeneca shots

Ontario has announced it’s keeping its stay-at-home order in place until at… Continue reading

The flag of the Supreme Court of Canada flies outside the building following a ceremony in Ottawa, Monday March 15, 2021. The owners of a horse that was disqualified after initially winning the Canadian Derby more than three years ago might have run out of legal room to reclaim the title. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Supreme Court won’t hear appeal from horse owners over derby dispute

OTTAWA — The owners of a horse that was disqualified after initially… Continue reading

People take part in a protest called 'Justice for Joyce' in Montreal, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020, where they demanded justice for Joyce Echaquan and an end to systemic racism. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
Quebec coroner’s inquest into death of Joyce Echaquan begins as her family testifies

MONTREAL — The husband of an Indigenous woman who was subjected to… Continue reading

Quebec Premier Francois Legault, centre, speaks during a news conference on the COVID-19 pandemic, Tuesday, May 11, 2021, at the legislature in Quebec City. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jacques Boissinot
Quebec tables revamp of French-language law, toughens rules for businesses, schools

MONTREAL — The Quebec government reasserted the right of Quebecers to live… Continue reading

Permanent residency
Canada announces new pathway to permanent residency for families of crash victims

Ottawa is launching a new policy to help the families of victims… Continue reading

Most Read