Photo by THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Hundreds of mothers protest against the amendments to the extradition law after Wednesday’s violent protest in Hong Kong on Friday. Calm appeared to have returned to Hong Kong after days of protests by students and human rights activists opposed to a bill that would allow suspects to be tried in mainland Chinese courts.

Canadians in Hong Kong worried for neighbours as protests roil former colony

As mass protests in Hong Kong grab headlines around the world, expatriate Canadians living in the former British colony say the demonstrations have been intense — and are raising fresh concerns about the territory’s future.

Three expatriates made it clear Friday they are deeply concerned for Hong Kong’s stressed-out population, even though their personal safety has not been put at risk.

“The mood right now in Hong Kong is tense and people are emotionally overwrought,” said Andrew Work, who lived and worked in Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia before moving to Hong Kong 23 years ago.

“They have very complex emotions because this all goes to the future of Hong Kong.”

The city’s downtown was calm Friday after days of demonstrations prompted by a proposed extradition law that would allow suspects to be sent to China for trial.

Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets on Sunday, and the protesters maintained a presence through Thursday night. They say they want to prevent the semi-autonomous Chinese territory from eroding the freedoms promised when Britain ended its colonial rule in 1997.

On Wednesday, Hong Kong police reportedly fired rubber bullets and beanbag rounds at protesters, leaving 81 people injured.

“I don’t think anyone (from Canada) is afraid for their public safety, unless they are choosing to engage directly in the public protests,” said Work, a public policy analyst and former executive director of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong.

“Hong Kong is one of the safest cities in the world.”

Work said the biggest concern for those living in Hong Kong is the perception that China is trying to impose its legal system on the territory — even though the extradition bill was drafted in Hong Kong.

“People trust the legal system in Hong Kong,” he said. “However, if the legal system in China is able to extend itself into Hong Kong … that is where they have a problem. This is why so many people … are taking to the streets.”

According to some estimates, there are more than 200,000 Canadians living in Hong Kong.

Hollie Ivany, a teacher from Cape Breton who has lived in Hong Kong for eight years, chose her words carefully when describing how she felt about the protests and Canada’s bruised relationship with China.

She said the people she knows from Hong Kong are struggling to understand what the proposed law will mean.

“It’s been tumultuous, stressful and difficult for them,” she said.

“As a foreigner, I have privilege and I am … somewhat removed from the situation … (But) I’ve been standing with them and observing the experience they’ve been having. It’s certainly on my radar. But by no means am I feeling unsafe.”

Meanwhile, the protests are threatening to further derail Canada’s already shaky relationship with China.

On Thursday, China’s embassy in Canada denounced the Canadian government’s recent comments on the protests as “irresponsible” and “erroneous.”

That appeared to be a reference to a statement from Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, who said any legislation should preserve Hong Kong’s autonomy, judicial independence and rule of law.

“Canada remains concerned about the potential effect these proposals may have on the large number of Canadian citizens in Hong Kong, on business confidence, and on Hong Kong’s international reputation,” Freeland said. “Freedom of expression and assembly are the bedrock of Hong Kong’s free society.”

Just Posted

Motorcross riders perform heart-stopping stunts at Red Deer’s Westerner Days

‘I wanted to see how far I could push myself and my machine,’ says rider

Oil and gas well cleanup costs could hit $65 billion, says industry watchdog

Alberta government urged to undertake detailed review of cleanup costs

Fatal disease strikes Alberta sheep

Scrapie detected on two Alberta farms

UCP candidate fined $70,000

Penalty against Jeff Callaway is for two dozen separate offences

Critics and industry clash over accuracy of Alberta well cleanup cost estimates

CALGARY — An Alberta coalition that says oil and gas producers are… Continue reading

Man shouting ‘You die’ kills 33 at Japan anime studio

TOKYO — A man screaming “You die!” burst into an animation studio… Continue reading

Documents shed light on seniors poverty figures used by federal Liberals

OTTAWA — Internal government documents say that many of the 57,000 seniors… Continue reading

High court won’t hear NDP expenses case over mailings, offices

OTTAWA — The Supreme Court may have just killed off the NDP’s… Continue reading

Justin Trudeau takes aim at NDP over EU-Canada trade pact as summit wraps up

MONTREAL — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is calling out New Democrats after… Continue reading

Defence calling no evidence in case of German tourist shot west of Calgary

CALGARY — The defence is calling no evidence on behalf of a… Continue reading

Tale of two libraries: Edmonton design backlash morphs into rivalry with Calgary

EDMONTON — The pitched reaction to Edmonton’s remodelled downtown library has morphed… Continue reading

Mountain pine beetle makes its way into Ponoka County

Assar Grinde has a special attachment to the pine trees that line… Continue reading

Most Read