EU ministers agree to relocate 120,000 refugees as tensions rise across southeast Europe

At a contentious meeting, European Union ministers agreed Tuesday to relocate 120,000 refugees among the bloc to ease the strains on front-line nations like Greece and Italy, which are being overwhelmed by the continent's ballooning migrant crisis.

BRUSSELS — At a contentious meeting, European Union ministers agreed Tuesday to relocate 120,000 refugees among the bloc to ease the strains on front-line nations like Greece and Italy, which are being overwhelmed by the continent’s ballooning migrant crisis.

But in a sign of deep-rooted divisions among the bloc’s 28 nations, the ministers who often reach decisions by consensus had to put the plan to a vote. And even with Tuesday’s hard-won agreement, the sheer numbers of migrants already in Europe this year — over 477,900 — shows the need for much greater action and wider vision down the road to resolve the migration crisis.

Milan Chovanec, the Czech Republic’s interior minister, said four nations — the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania and Hungary — all voted against the plan and Finland abstained.

“(It’s) a bad decision and the Czech Republic did all it could to block it,” Prime Minister Bohuslav Sobotka said.

The deal on Tuesday did not set mandatory quotas for each nation — one of the most controversial aspects of the proposed plan.

EU Commission First Vice-President Frans Timmermans sought to put a positive spin on the vote, saying it showed the bloc is “capable of taking decisions even if, for some member states, these are very difficult decisions.”

“This decision is an important, essential building block in what is a much larger approach we will have to take,” Timmermans said. But he conceded that “by itself, the decision we took today is not going to solve the refugee crisis.”

Now, he said, the EU has to do a better job of protecting its borders, registering migrants who arrive, quickly returning people who are not eligible for asylum and “providing hope and perspective” in conflict-torn countries from which many of the migrants flee.

EU leaders will gather in Brussels on Wednesday night to discuss those measures and attempt to adopt a unified approach to the migrant crisis.

German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere said his country would take more than 30,000 of the 120,000 people.

“We are doing this out of solidarity and responsibility, but also in our own interest,” he said. “At the moment, something like 50 per cent of those who are arriving in Greece are coming to Germany. With a quota of 26 per cent, fewer of this group would come.”

De Maiziere said the deal also aims to cut “secondary migration,” in which those seeking asylum move from one country to another within Europe.

“If people are distributed in Europe, then they can’t choose what country they go to. They have to stay in the country they were distributed to,” he said.

Hours before the ministers talked in Brussels, migrants scuffled with police at a transit camp in Croatia and nations in southeast Europe scolded and threatened each other as the unrelenting flow of asylum-seekers raised diplomatic tensions to a boiling point.

The United Nations’ refugee agency said the next few days may be the last chance for a coherent European response as hundreds of thousands flow from war-torn areas in the Middle East, Africa and Asia to Europe.

The U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees warned that the proposal on the table isn’t enough to stabilize the situation, because 477,906 people have already entered Europe by sea this year. It urged the EU to quickly set up facilities in Greece, where tens of thousands have arrived after making the hazardous sea crossing from Turkey.

This may be “the last opportunity for a coherent European response,” said Melissa Fleming, a spokeswoman for UNHCR.

Tensions between Serbia and Croatia took a sharp turn for the worse, with Serbia giving Croatia an ultimatum to reopen its border — or risk unspecified counter- measures. Croatia shut down all but one of its border crossings with Serbia last week to block the flow of migrants, which has now reached 34,900 in less than a week. But the action is crippling Serbia’s economy, which transports cargo across Croatia to reach much of Europe.

On Tuesday afternoon, Croatia started letting trucks carrying foodstuff from Serbia cross the border, but Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandar Vucic, who wants all cargo traffic restored, said that was not enough.

Earlier, Vucic called an emergency session of all security services, including the military, to discuss the crisis. The two nations have a tense history after fighting bitterly in the Balkan wars of the 1990s.

“This is a scandal of international proportions,” Vucic said. “Croatia has breached all European agreements and directives.”

Croatia, angry that Serbia was busing migrants to its border, seemed unlikely to honour any Serb demand.

“Mix it up a little,” Croatian Prime Minister Zoran Milanovic said. “Send them a bit to Hungary and Romania.”

In Greece, bad weather created more misery as thunderstorms drenched hundreds who had been camping out in a main square in Athens.

“We have nothing. No water, no food, no shelter. We are living in tents, we need help,” said Mohamed Saber Nazari, a 20-year-old Afghan camping in Victoria Square. “You see all the families living in the rain, with small children? Something must be organized for us.”

A local taxi driver sympathized with the migrant’s plight. Adrian Mustafa, 45, had walked to Greece from Albania more than 20 years ago and has been living in the country since then.

“If you go through what these people are going through, only then will you understand,” he said. “They don’t want to stay here, but they live under bad conditions.”

Just Posted

A representative for the office of Minister of Justice and Solicitor General Kaycee Madu says the new Red Deer drug treatment court is expected to be operational by the middle of 2022. (File photo by Advocate staff)
Red Deer drug treatment court expected to be up and running no later than mid-2022

The Government of Alberta expects the new Red Deer drug treatment court… Continue reading

Environment Canada says rain Tuesday evening will turn to snow. (File photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Expect wet snow Tuesday night central Alberta

Heavy wet snow could accumlate with the potential for broken tree branches

FILE - In this Thursday, April 29, 2021 file photo, giant bucket-wheel excavators extract coal at the controversial Garzweiler surface coal mine near Jackerath, west Germany. A report by the International Energy Agency on Tuesday, May 18, 2021 says immediate action is needed to reshape the world’s energy sector in order to meet ambitious climate goals by 2050. This includes ending investments in new coal mines, oil and gas wells. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
Energy agency: End new fossil fuel supply investments

IEA report sets out 400 steps to transform how energy is produced, transported and used

A man inspects the rubble of destroyed commercial building and Gaza health care clinic following an Israeli airstrike on the upper floors of a commercial building near the Health Ministry in Gaza City, on Monday, May 17, 2021. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)
Strike from Gaza kills 2 as Israel topples 6-story building

Latest attack from Gaza on Tuesday hits packaging plant

The RCMP logo is seen outside Royal Canadian Mounted Police “E” Division Headquarters, in Surrey, B.C., on Friday April 13, 2018. A review by the national spy watchdog has found inconsistencies when it comes to federal efforts to ensure information sharing with foreign agencies does not result in torture. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Spy watchdog calls for changes to ensure information-sharing does not lead to torture

Differences in federal departments stances when dealing with the same foreign agency creates concern

Red Deer musician Curtis Phagoo is glad the Alberta government is investing $2 million to help the province’s live music industry, but he would have liked the criteria to be expanded, so the money could be used as relief to cover revenue shortfalls. (Contributed photo by Cory Michaud)
Red Deer musicians welcome $2M in grants to help live music, but would have preferred relief program

The money is for future projects and can’t be used for retroactive expenses

Sheffield United’s Daniel Jebbison celebrates after scoring his side’s opening goal during the English Premier League soccer match between Everton and Sheffield United at Goodison Park in Liverpool, England, Sunday, May 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Alex Pantling/Pool via AP
Canadian teenager Daniel Jebbison turns heads with Premier League goal

Jebbison, 17, is the youngest player in Premier League history to score on his first start in England’s top tier

This image released by Universal Pictures shows Nathalie Emmanuel, left, and Vin Diesel in a scene from “F9.” (Giles Keyte/Universal Pictures via AP)
The blockbuster movie makes a comeback this summer

Last year, summer earnings were $176 million, down 96% from 2019

FILE - In this Feb. 3, 2021, file photo, exile Tibetans use the Olympic Rings as a prop as they hold a street protest against the holding of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics, in Dharmsala, India. Groups alleging human-rights abuses in China are calling for a full boycott of the Beijing Olympics, which is sure to ratchet up pressure on the International Olympic Committee, athletes, sponsors, and sports federations. A coalition of activists representing Uyghurs, Tibetans, residents of Hong Kong and others, issued a statement Monday, May 17, 2021 calling for the “full boycott,” eschewing lesser measures like “diplomatic boycotts" and negotiations with the IOC or China. (AP Photo/Ashwini Bhatia, File)
AP Exclusive: Full-blown boycott pushed for Beijing Olympics

AP Exclusive: Full-blown boycott pushed for Beijing Olympics

Canada's Eric Lamaze riding Fine Lady 5 during the CP International competition at the Spruce Meadows Masters in Calgary, Alta., Sunday, Sept. 8, 2019. Canada's most decorated show jumper has withdrawn from consideration for the Tokyo Olympics. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Canadian show jumper Eric Lamaze withdraws from Tokyo short list

Canadian show jumper Eric Lamaze withdraws from Tokyo short list

Toronto Raptors head coach Nick Nurse questions a foul call during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Cleveland Cavaliers Monday, April 26, 2021, in Tampa, Fla. Nurse says it was the COVID-19 outbreak in March that spiked his team's chances for a post-season run.THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Chris O'Meara
Nurse faces a busy off-season, much busier if Canada qualifies for Tokyo Olympics

Nurse faces a busy off-season, much busier if Canada qualifies for Tokyo Olympics

Hockey Hall of Fame inductee Danielle Goyette speaks to reporters during a press conference in Toronto on Friday, November 10, 2017. Goyette has been named director of player development for the NHL's Toronto Maple Leafs and their American Hockey League affiliate. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov
Hayley Wickenheiser, Danielle Goyette together again on Toronto Maple Leafs staff

Hayley Wickenheiser, Danielle Goyette together again on Toronto Maple Leafs staff

Most Read