Greyhound asks to cut to five B.C. routes

VANCOUVER — Greyhound Canada has applied to regulators in British Columbia to drop five routes, four of them in northern B.C., as the company deals with plunging ridership.

Greyhound calls the decision “regrettably unavoidable” but said there has been a 51 per cent drop in riders since 2010, along with higher costs and increased competition from publicly subsidized services.

Routes that would be eliminated include a 718-kilometre run along Highway 16, the so-called Highway of Tears, between Prince George and Prince Rupert.

After dozens of murders and disappearances of women along that highway, the province, local governments and BC Transit launched a subsidized route in June connecting Burns Lake, Prince George and Smithers, mirroring portions of the Greyhound route.

The company has also applied to drop its routes from Prince George to Valemount, Prince George to Dawson Creek, Dawson Creek to Whitehorse and Victoria to Nanaimo.

Stuart Kendrick, senior vice-president at Greyhound, said the application was filed with the Passenger Transportation Board earlier this month and the process normally takes about 90 days but could be longer because of the proposal to cut five routes.

“We can’t continue to operate these routes at a loss,” he said, adding Greyhound can’t compete with subsidized BC Transit.

“We’ve communicated to the provincial government for several years that this is eroding our business. It does create an unfair playing field and when you have subsidized transit they’re able to offer fares that are much lower than ours,” Kendrick said.

“Connectivity from northern B.C. into the main corridors is really what the customer needs and right now it’s not a viable option for a private carrier.”

Greyhound is continuing its discussions with provincial and federal officials regarding viable options for transportation in rural areas, Kendrick said.

Terry Teegee, tribal chief of the Prince George-based Carrier Sekani First Nation, said other private companies also would be unlikely make a profit for the same reasons but rural residents need reliable transportation between communities that are geographically spread out.

Just Posted

City prepares for legal marijuana

Legalized recreational marijuana expected to have impact on many city policies

Council turns down rent subsidies

Request for $50,000 to help fill 12 empty suites in Asooahum Crossing affordable living complex

REIMAGINE SYLVAN has begun

Waterfront area redevelopment plan to be updated

Red Deer College a top Hockey campus

Expedia Canada ranks hockey campuses

Looking out for neighbours to fight rural crime

Building community to address crime

WATCH Replay Red Deer Feb. 18: Your weekly news highlights

Watch news from Red Deer and Central Alberta

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Ambulance’s slow response time angers family

Woman suffers stroke, waits nearly an hour for ambulance

Over-burdened refugee tribunal ditches legislated timelines for hearings

OTTAWA — The Immigration and Refugee Board is giving up on following… Continue reading

Sheraton Celebrity Dance Off profile: Troy Gillard

** Sheraton Celebrity Dance Off takes place on April 14 at the Sheraton Red Deer

New mobile paramedic program starts in Red Deer

Paramedics provide on-site care to those with chronic conditions

Toddler breaks leg after boot sucked into escalator at Vancouver airport

VANCOUVER — A Calgary woman is reminding parents about the dangers of… Continue reading

Liberals looking at creating use-it-or-lose-it leave for fathers, Trudeau says

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is raising the idea of creating… Continue reading

Trump gets angry about election meddling, but not at Russia

‘Weirdest thing’: Trump expresses anger, but not over Russian election-meddling

Most Read


Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $185 for 260 issues (must live in delivery area to qualify) Unlimited Digital Access 99 cents for the first four weeks and then only $15 per month Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $15 a month