Hands of Humanity

Nationally acclaimed Red Deer quilter Patti Morris used over 1,000 pieces of hand-painted cloth to portray the work of Doctors Beyond Borders in her quilt Hands of Humanity. Patterned from actual photos of children in need in developing countries and doctors who respond, it makes a serious statement.

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Nationally acclaimed Red Deer quilter Patti Morris used over 1,000 pieces of hand-painted cloth to portray the work of Doctors Beyond Borders in her quilt Hands of Humanity.

Patterned from actual photos of children in need in developing countries and doctors who respond, it makes a serious statement.

Rough fabric edges and dangling threads she incorporated into the quilt bring to mind the impoverished conditions in which people live.

Hands of Humanity took about eight months to finish. But for Morris, it was a labour of love. Life is good here in Central Alberta and we can make it better for others, the fabric artist said.