Innisfail business Bladez to Fadez Barbershop plans to open its doors Tuesday despite the mandatory COVID-19 restrictions currently in place. (Photo courtesy Bladez to Fadez Barbershop Facebook)

Innisfail business Bladez to Fadez Barbershop plans to open its doors Tuesday despite the mandatory COVID-19 restrictions currently in place. (Photo courtesy Bladez to Fadez Barbershop Facebook)

Central Alberta barbershop plans to open Tuesday despite COVID-19 restrictions

Gov’t of Alberta extended restrictions to Jan. 21 this past week

Despite COVID-19 restrictions being extended to Jan. 21 in Alberta, the owners of an Innisfail barbershop have stated they intend to open their doors on Tuesday.

A post on the Bladez to Fadez Barbershop Facebook page said “after much research and looking at COVID-19 cases in Innisfail” the business will open at 9 a.m.

“After abiding by all mandatory rules set in place and applying for the promised government grants, we received nothing,” said Facebook post, which was published Thursday.

“Our lives have been severely impacted by a closure of personal services and yet there was not one documented case in our industry.

“Our government has failed yet again. In light of the last four weeks of political so called role models defying restrictions and still suffering no financial loss as so many of the personal small business industry had to endure, we will open.”

The Facebook post has hundreds of shares and more than 1,000 likes as of Sunday.

“Regardless of the outcome of new or lifted restrictions, we will stand up for our (livelihood). I consider this a mandatory mental health service,” the Facebook post said.

“With weeks of cleaning and disinfecting the shop and all protocols in place, we are ready to resume business. Thank you to all that support local and small businesses.”

Earlier this week, Premier Jason Kenney announced COVID-19 restrictions would be extended two weeks in an effort to slow down the spread of the virus in the province. These restrictions impact a number of industries, including hair salons or barbershops, restaurants and fitness facilities.

The restrictions were originally set to expire on Tuesday.

In a statement, Alberta Health Services said it is aware some Albertans are “actively promoting reopening their business” despite the mandatory restrictions currently in place.

“At this time, hairstyling and barbering services are not permitted to operate under the current public health restrictions, which will remain in place at least until Jan. 21,” AHS said.

“As such, all businesses are required to respect and follow the orders of Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, at all times. Businesses that don’t follow the orders are at risk of closure orders or fines.”



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