File photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS Environment Minister Catherine McKenna says she thinks some of the Senate’s proposals made to a bill overhauling the federal environmental-assessment process for major construction projects much stronger.

Liberals reject most Tory amendments to environmental assessment bill

OTTAWA — The federal Liberals will accept nearly 100 changes the Senate has made to a bill overhauling the federal environmental-assessment process for major construction projects but are rejecting dozens more, including nearly all of those proposed by Conservative senators.

Conservative Sen. David Tkachuk said he is “appalled” at the government’s decision.

“If you think Saskatchewan and Alberta are going to take this lying down, I think the country’s got another thing coming,” he said.

Environment Minister Catherine McKenna says she thinks some of the Senate’s proposals made the bill much stronger, including those that reduce the authority of the minister of the environment to interfere with timelines or the make-up of review panels, and some that clarify rules to ensure the same project won’t have to go through both a regional and a national review.

She said she is certain the new review process for national-scale resource and transportation projects, like pipelines, mines and highways, will be clear and timely. She said it will allow for as many as 100 new resource projects worth $500 billion to be proposed and examined over the next 10 years.

“This is a system that will attract investment,” McKenna said. “This is a system that Canadians, that Canadian businesses should be proud of. We can go and tell everyone that Canada is open for business.”

McKenna is rejecting 90 per cent of the amendments made by Conservatives, including some which would have allowed a new Impact Assessment Agency to decide not to consider the impacts on Indigenous people or climate change when assessing a project. She also is rejecting changes that would have put strict limits on who can participate in an assessment hearing, as well as make it harder to challenge a project approval in court.

Environment groups hailed the government’s decision as a win for the planet, ensuring climate change in particular is taken into consideration.

Conservatives, however, are warning their fight against Bill C-69, which they say is a threat to national unity, has barely begun.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney is pondering a constitutional challenge, saying the bill infringes on provinces’ rights to control their own natural resources and that it will kill what is left of Alberta’s oil-and-gas sector.

“Without the Senate’s amendments, this bill will drive away more jobs and investment from Canada,” Kenney said. “It is not too late for the federal government, the House and the Senate to do the right thing and sustain the Senate’s amendments.”

Kenney led six premiers — five conservative provincial leaders and one non-partisan territorial leader — to write to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Monday asking him to accept all the amendments in the name of national unity. Trudeau called it irresponsible to raise the spectre of tearing the country apart just because the premiers weren’t getting everything they wanted from Ottawa.

Kenney has tried to bring Quebec Premier Francois Legault, who leads the right-leaning Coalition Avenir Quebec, into the group of premiers declaring a threat to national unity. The Alberta premier was in Montreal Wednesday to meet with Legault and invoked a “historic alliance” between the two provinces during the 1982 talks on patriating the Constitution.

Legault won’t sign the letter. He does not like the parts of C-69 that he says infringe on provincial jurisdiction but thinks the other premiers want to cut back too much on environmental protections.

McKenna said conservative premiers, MPs and senators, as well as the oil-and-gas lobbyists, wanted a bill that would guarantee every pipeline proposed would be approved, rather than an environmental-assessment process to ensure only good projects that help the economy while protecting the environment go ahead.

“They want us to copy and paste recommendations written by oil lobbyists that would block court challenges, that would make it easier for future governments to ignore the views of Indigenous Peoples, that would limit Canadians’ input and shut Canadians out of the process, and that would increase political interference in decision-making,” McKenna said.

She said the government listened to the concerns of the provinces and accused the Conservatives of polarizing the country by changing the law in 2012 to favour the oil industry at the expense of the environment and Indigenous rights.

The House of Commons must debate and then vote on the government motion responding to the Senate amendments but the Liberals’ majority virtually guarantees that the government will get its way. Then the Senate gets another shot at the bill.

Bill C69

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alberta, Ottawa sign deal that reduces oilsands environmental monitoring

EDMONTON — Alberta has signed an agreement with the federal government that… Continue reading

Two injured after plane crashes in interior B.C. parking lot

NELSON, B.C. — Two people were injured after a plane crashed and… Continue reading

Province to provide update on return-to-school measures Tuesday

Some parents will consider homeschooling if online learning isn’t available

Man dies after being found in North Saskatchewan River southwest of Edmonton

EDMONTON — A 53-year old man has died after he was found… Continue reading

Protester says officials wanted to remove teepee from Saskatchewan legislature

REGINA — An organizer of a month-long march calling for suicide prevention… Continue reading

David Marsden: Back-to-school plan makes sense

Albertans are wise to propose ways to improve students’ return to classrooms… Continue reading

Honda recalls 1.6M vans and SUVs in 4 different US recalls

DETROIT — Honda is recalling over 1.6 million minivans and SUVs in… Continue reading

Wall Street drifts as strong, months long rally takes a pause

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks are drifting in early trading on Tuesday… Continue reading

Manila back under lockdown as virus cases surge

MANILA, Philippines — Commuter trains, buses and other public vehicles stayed off… Continue reading

First cancer diagnosed in dinosaur fossil hints at communal life

First cancer diagnosed in dinosaur fossil hints at communal life EDMONTON —… Continue reading

NHL hit with criticism over English-only version of “O Canada” on Saturday

NHL hit with criticism over English-only version of “O Canada” on Saturday

Blackhawks’ Caggiula suspended for Game 2 vs. Oilers

Blackhawks’ Caggiula suspended for Game 2 vs. Oilers

Jets rebound with 3-2 win over Flames, even qualifying series 1-1

Jets rebound with 3-2 win over Flames, even qualifying series 1-1

Most Read