Lindsay responsible for stabbing: psychiatrist

After two days of testimony, a Crown expert witness concluded Mark Damien Lindsay appreciated the consequence of stabbing an Edmonton mother of three.

After two days of testimony, a Crown expert witness concluded Mark Damien Lindsay appreciated the consequence of stabbing an Edmonton mother of three.

Dr. Peter Rodd, a forensic psychiatrist, concluded Lindsay, 29, was criminally responsible for the August 2011 killing of Dana Turner.

Rodd cited Lindsay’s actions following the incident, calling them organized and purposeful, adding Lindsay’s behaviour was consistent with trying to conceal the offence. This, Rodd said, made him aware of the wrongness of the act.

After killing Turner, Lindsay bought a shovel and other items from a Rona hardware store, he drove all over Alberta to dispose of the body and other items and even plotted to get out of Alberta when he went to his parents house to get his resume and welding materials.

Rodd also pointed to the role drugs played. Lindsay has had a lifelong battle with substance abuse and was told on numerous occasions to abstain. Leading up to the night of Turner’s murder, Lindsay used cocaine and drank alcohol.

This led Rodd to believe drugs may have played a role in the act.

Inconsistencies between Lindsay’s reported delusions and his behaviour also came to light on the second day of expert testimony from a Crown witness.

Crown Prosecutor Bina Border directed Rodd’s attention to the paranoid delusion Lindsay, 29, has said precipitated his killing of Turner, 31.

Lindsay believed a group of serial killers called Healers was out to kill him and Turner was who they sent.

Evidence presented at trial indicated Lindsay believed the police were a part of the Healers plot against him.

However, Border pointed to a March 21, 2011 incident where Lindsay barricaded himself in his apartment and called the police. Rodd said this behaviour was inconsistent with Lindsay’s belief the police were out to get him.

In reviewing Dr. Marc Nesca, a defence expert witness and psychologist, Rodd called into question his findings of some of Lindsay’s behaviour. Rodd said there were a number of episodes that “on the surface” looked like psychiatric incidents, but he identified efforts to manipulate circumstances to fit Nesca’s diagnosis.

Some reports describe Lindsay’s behaviour and acting out at facilities he was held at as volitional, by Lindsay’s choice.

Other behaviour described in reports read by Rodd indicated Lindsay’s behaviour was mostly substance seeking and purposeful, and not indicative of disorganized behaviour.

Lindsay’s paranoia and diagnosed schizophrenia have been the focus of much the trial. Defence expert witnesses have made a correlation between Lindsay’s schizophrenia and the psychosis that led to the attack on Turner.

Lindsay is charged with second degree murder in the death of Turner. Turner was stabbed in the eye with a pencil, strangled and ran over by a car in August 2011.

At the time, Lindsay was recently released from the Fort Saskatchewan Correctional Centre. Lindsay had served a 50-day sentence for stabbing Turner in the face with a knife. The two had been in a relationship.

Defence counsel have acknowledged Lindsay committed the crime. The trial questions whether or not he should be held criminally responsible.

Trial resumes on Monday when defence counsel Kent Teskey will cross examine Rodd.

mcrawford@bprda.wpengine.com

Just Posted

Police say a woman in the Red Deer area may be in danger

Public’s assistance is urgently requested

Cannabis legalization won’t impact one Red Deer pot dispensary

Nothing changes for Compass Cannabis Clinic in Red Deer despite legalization

Cannabis retail store will open later in October in Red Deer

Two cannabis stores coming to downtown Red Deer

Neighbours drop opposition to Red Deer County communications tower

Communication tower to be located in Balmoral Heights

Legal cannabis comes with many unknowns: Red Deer County councillors

Councillors question how rural municipalities will be able to enforce cannabis regulations

WATCH: Two weeks away from Canadian Finals Rodeo in Red Deer

In just two weeks, Ponoka’s Shayna Weir will compete with the best… Continue reading

PHOTO: Chew On This! campaign draws attention to national poverty

Lunchbags were being handed out in front of The Hub downtown on… Continue reading

Wickenheiser, Pegula reflect NHL’s trend toward diversity

BUFFALO, N.Y. — With a laugh, Kim Pegula’s competitive nature kicked in… Continue reading

Harry and Meghan bring rain to drought-stricken Outback town

DUBBO, Australia — The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were jokingly thanked… Continue reading

TV Review: A Roseanne Barr-less ‘The Conners’ is a triumph

NEW YORK — Can there be a “Roseanne” without Roseanne? The answer… Continue reading

Canadian manufacturing sales fell 0.4 per cent in August: Statistics Canada

OTTAWA — Statistics Canada says manufacturing sales fell 0.4 per cent to… Continue reading

Brian Mulroney joins board of directors of New York-based pot company

NEW YORK — Former prime minister Brian Mulroney is joining the board… Continue reading

Canadians waking up to legalized cannabis: ‘My new dealer is the prime minister’

ST. JOHN’S, N.L. — Canadians across the country woke up to legalized… Continue reading

B.C. man accused of swimming naked in Toronto shark tank arrested in Thunder Bay

THUNDER BAY, Ont. — Police have arrested a B.C. man who is… Continue reading

Most Read