A view of buildings damaged in an earthquake in Petrinja, Croatia, Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020. A strong earthquake has hit central Croatia and caused major damage and at least one death and some 20 injuries in the town southeast of the capital Zagreb. (AP Photo)

A view of buildings damaged in an earthquake in Petrinja, Croatia, Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020. A strong earthquake has hit central Croatia and caused major damage and at least one death and some 20 injuries in the town southeast of the capital Zagreb. (AP Photo)

Magnitude 6.3 earthquake strikes Croatia; 6 deaths reported

PETRINJA, Croatia — A strong earthquake hit central Croatia on Tuesday, destroying buildings and sending panicked people fleeing into rubble-covered streets in a town southeast of the capital. Authorities said at least six people were killed and dozens were injured.

The European Mediterranean Seismological Center said the magnitude 6.3 quake hit 46 kilometres (28 miles) southeast of Zagreb. It caused widespread damage in the hardest-hit town of Petrinja. The same area was struck by a 5.2 quake on Monday.

Officials said a 12-year-old girl died in Petrinja, a town of some 25,000 people. Another five people were killed in a nearly destroyed village close to the town, according to the state HRT television. At least 20 people were hospitalized, two with serious injuries, officials said, adding that many more people are unaccounted for.

In Petrinja, cries could be heard from underneath destroyed houses. One woman was found alive some four hours after the quake. Emergency teams used rescue dogs while looking for survivors, while family members looked on in despair.

“My town has been completely destroyed. We have dead children,” Petrinja Mayor Darinko Dumbovic said in a statement broadcast by HRT. “This is like Hiroshima – half of the city no longer exists.”

Marica Pavlovic, a resident, said the quake felt “worse than a war.”

“It was horrible, a shock, you don’t know what to do, whether to run out or hide somewhere,” she told The Associated Press.

Croatian Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic and other government ministers arrived in Petrinja after the earthquake.

“The biggest part of central Petrinja is in a red zone, which means that most of the buildings are not usable,” Plenkovic said.

He said the army has 500 places ready in barracks to house people, while others will be accommodated in nearby hotels and other places.

“No one must stay out in the cold tonight,” the prime minister said.

Officials also toured a damaged hospital in the nearby town of Sisak, which was also badly hit. Plenkovic said the patients will be evacuated in army helicopters and ambulances.

Health officials said a baby was delivered in a tent in front of the hospital in the aftermath of the earthquake.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said on Twitter that she spoke with Plenkovic and instructed an envoy to travel to Croatia as soon as possible.

As a Mediterranean country, Croatia is prone to earthquakes, but not big ones. The last strong quake struck in the 1990s when the picturesque Adriatic coast village of Ston was destroyed.

Regional TV channel N1 reported from Petrinja that a collapsed building had fallen on a car. The footage showed firefighters trying to remove the debris. A man and a small boy eventually were rescued from the car and carried into an ambulance.

The Croatian military was deployed in the region to help with the rescue operation.

Croatian seismologist Kresimir Kuk described the earthquake as “extremely strong,” far stronger than another one that hit Zagreb and nearby areas in the spring. He warned people to keep out of potentially shaky old buildings and move to newer areas of the city because of aftershocks.

In the capital, people ran into the streets in fear.

The earthquake was felt throughout the country and in neighbouring Serbia, Bosnia and Slovenia. It was felt as far away as Graz in southern Austria, the Austria Press Agency reported.

Authorities in Slovenia said the Krsko nuclear power plant was temporarily shut down following the earthquake. The power plant is jointly owned by Slovenia and Croatia and located near their border.

___

AP writers Dusan Stojanovic and Jovana Gec in Belgrade, Serbia, contributed to this report.

Sasa Kavic, The Associated Press

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