Albertans have among the gloomiest predictions for the year ahead among Canadians polled by Angus Reid. (File photo by The Canadian Press)

Albertans have among the gloomiest predictions for the year ahead among Canadians polled by Angus Reid. (File photo by The Canadian Press)

One in three Albertans have gloomy prediction for coming year

29% of Albertans expect to be worse off a year from now

Albertans have gloomy predictions for what the coming year holds, according to an Angus Reid poll.

Those polled were asked about whether they will be financially better or worse off than their current state.

Twenty-nine per cent of Albertans polled said they expected to be worse off a year from now and only 22 per cent expected to be doing better. Thirty-eight per cent of respondents expected no change and 11 per cent weren’t sure.

Only Saskatchewans had a dimmer view of the next 12 months, with 32 per cent expecting to be worse off, 19 per cent better off, 39 per cent the same and 10 per cent weren’t sure.

Nationally, 21 per cent expected to be worse off in 2022 and 24 per cent expected things to be looking up. Forty-six per cent expected no change and nine per cent weren’t sure.

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Asked whether they were better or worse off than a year ago, 45 per cent of Albertans and 43 per cent of Saskatchewans said worse off.

Forty-one per cent of Albertans said they were about the same, with only 13 per cent — the lowest in Canada and tied with Saskatchewan and Newfoundland — saying they were better off.

Nationally, 34 per cent said they were worse off than a year ago, 45 per cent the same and 20 per cent better off.

Angus Reid said the numbers reflect that Alberta and Saskatchewan are the two provinces most economically independent on the oil and gas industry, which was rocked by plummeting oil prices last year and then low demand because of the pandemic.

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Angus Reid says inflation is becoming an issue now that the end appears to be in sight for the 16-month pandemic.

The consumer price index — which tracks the broad cost of living in Canada — is up 3.6 per cent over last year.

Nine in 10 Canadians (92 per cent) say their weekly grocery bills went up and 85 per cent expect further increases.

Eighty-five per cent expect gasoline prices to rise, 81 per cent home prices, 80 per cent major home improvements, 71 per cent interest rates, 70 per cent car prices and 64 per cent rent.

Fifty-six per cent of renters said their monthly rent bill has already gone up over the last six months.



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