Police played on B.C. woman’s obedience to pull her into terror plot: lawyer

A B.C. court has heard that a woman charged with plotting to blow up the provincial legislature was ensnared by undercover police who insisted she take part in a staged terrorist attack.

VANCOUVER — A B.C. court has heard that a woman charged with plotting to blow up the provincial legislature was ensnared by undercover police who insisted she take part in a staged terrorist attack.

Amanda Korody’s defence lawyer Mark Jette says the RCMP took advantage of his client — a methadone-dependent woman who was living on welfare and spent most of her time in her basement suite.

Korody and her husband John Nuttall have pleaded not guilty to planting pressure-cooker bombs on the grounds of the B.C. legislature on Canada Day two years ago.

Jette says police working on an undercover sting operation repeatedly worked to pull Korody into their orbit by convincing Nuttall to involve her in an alleged terrorist plot.

He described her relationship with Nuttall as that of a submissive and obedient wife, who would frequently behave as if he were his commanding officer.

The B.C. Supreme Court jury is hearing closing arguments this week.