Problem beaver biting dogs at Three Mile Bend

A beaver reported to have bitten dogs at Three Mile Bend will be trapped and removed from the park.

Heather Markiw’s German shepherd cross Sierra is still nursing wounds Monday she got when a beaver attacked her recently.

Heather Markiw’s German shepherd cross Sierra is still nursing wounds Monday she got when a beaver attacked her recently.

A beaver reported to have bitten dogs at Three Mile Bend will be trapped and removed from the park.

According to dog owners, last week one dog died from blood-loss from its wound.

Heather Markiw, of Red Deer, said Sierra, one of her 10-month-old shepherd-cross dogs, needed 10 to 15 stitches after it tangled with a beaver on an island in a pond at the park.

“It’s suppose to be a safe place for dogs to play and be off-leash,” Markiw said on Monday.

“We’re fortunate. We want people to be aware.”

Her two dogs regularly swim out to the island near the parking lot at the park entrance. Last Thursday at about 6:30 p.m., she called her dogs back after they started barking loudly. When Sierra returned, blood was dripping from near her hind leg.

Sierra was kept overnight at a veterinary clinic and still has a drainage tube so she can urinate.

Markiw said when she first spotted a beaver at Three Mile Bend she thought it was cute.

“It’s not so cute anymore.”

Markiw said she’s heard about four dogs being injured by beaver in the last week.

Trevor Poth, city parks supervisor, said an investigation is underway and the park will be closed at night next week for a day or two to trap the beaver.

“We will be out there and get it taken care of so it’s completely safe again,” Poth said.

Six weeks ago, a dog owner reported their dog was bit by a beaver in a pond after the dog went after the beaver. Signs were put up in the park to warn dog owners about the possible dangers of all wildlife in the park, not just beavers.

Poth said beavers are rarely aggressive unless threatened by other animals. If there’s a beaver family in the area, beavers could be very protective.

“It’s not necessarily the dogs fault. Dogs are not exposed to wildlife so they are more interested. They just want to be snoopy and figure out what’s going on.”

Poth said at the park dog owners are suppose to have control of their dogs at all times both on and off-leash for everyone’s protection. Dogs should come when called or signaled by whistling.

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