RCMP to show Oct. 22 shooter’s video Friday

Members of Parliament will get the chance Friday to see the video Michael Zehaf Bibeau made last October before he killed a Canadian soldier and stormed Parliament Hill.

OTTAWA — Members of Parliament will get the chance Friday to see the video Michael Zehaf Bibeau made last October before he killed a Canadian soldier and stormed Parliament Hill.

The RCMP will use an open meeting of the House of Commons public safety committee on Friday to provide a ’detailed update’ of the investigation into Zehaf Bibeau’s deadly attack, said a source familiar with the matter.

The source, who wasn’t authorized to discuss the matter publicly and so spoke on condition of anonymity, confirmed the video would be shown to the committee.

A spokesman for the public safety minister said Tuesday the federal government wants the video to be released, despite the fact the investigation into the shooting is ongoing. The Commons public safety and Senate security committees have echoed that sentiment.

However, when asked about the matter Wednesday, Prime Minister Stephen Harper said it’s entirely up to the RCMP whether to release the video, since it’s part of an ongoing police investigation.

“It’s not my decision one way or the other,” Harper told a news conference in Toronto.

“The video is in the possession of the RCMP, it’s part of a police investigation, so it’s their judgment when and where to release it.”

Harper went on to say Canadians are all too aware of an ever-present threat posed by “violent jihadism” and should continue to be vigilant and to co-operate with authorities.

In the days following the attack, RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson said he wanted Canadians to see what he described as footage of Zehaf Bibeau explaining his actions in a deliberate and lucid manner.

He has since said that while some transcripts might be provided to the public, he didn’t think the video would ever be released.

Harper was also asked whether the government intends to entertain possible amendments to its controversial anti-terror legislation.

Harper said he didn’t want to prejudge the outcome of upcoming committee hearings, but suggested additional changes are unlikely.

“We do always listen, but I should be very clear the government deliberated long and hard over these changes; they’re changes that have been done in almost every other country,” he said.

“In our view most of them are long overdue and we are fully committed to passage of the legislation, and I note the public is very, very strongly supportive of passage of the legislation also.”

The bill would significantly expand the Canadian Security Intelligence Service’s mandate, giving CSIS the ability to disrupt terror plots, make it easier to limit the movements of a suspect, expand no-fly list powers, crack down on terrorist propaganda, and remove barriers to sharing security-related information.

Opposition MPs have repeatedly criticized the government for boosting security powers in the legislation but not giving watchdogs more bite.

Just Posted

Innisfail Eagles win Senior AAA provincial semifinal, earn final spot in Allan Cup

For the first time in their 71-year history, the Innisfail Eagles will… Continue reading

Ford says social media allows politicians to circumvent mainstream journalists

OTTAWA — Premier Doug Ford says mainstream journalists have become irrelevant because… Continue reading

Montreal priest stabbed during mass leaves hospital; suspect to be charged

MONTREAL — A Catholic priest who was stabbed as he was celebrating… Continue reading

The endless war against invasive species

Group looks to protect native ecological environments in Alberta

Good-bye ice and snow, hello potholes on Red Deer roads

City workers will be spending 20 hours a day on various road repairs

WATCH: Fashion show highlights Cree designers

The fashion show was part of a Samson Cree Nation conference on MMIW

Pricey Titanic wreck tours hope to bring new life to a century-old story

ST. JOHN’S, N.L. — Adventure tourists with money in the bank have… Continue reading

France investigates after older protester is injured in Nice

NICE, France — French authorities are investigating the case of an older… Continue reading

DOJ: Trump campaign did not co-ordinate with Russia in 2016

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department said Sunday that special counsel Robert Mueller’s… Continue reading

New report details impact of proposed NS spaceport in event of explosion or fire

HALIFAX — The head of a company proposing to open Canada’s only… Continue reading

Rothmans, Benson & Hedges gets creditor protection in $15B Quebec lawsuit

MONTREAL — Rothmans, Benson & Hedges has become the third tobacco company… Continue reading

Monster Energy drink recalled due to possible glass fragments

OTTAWA — Monster Energy Canada Ltd. is recalling one of its drinks… Continue reading

Global ocean group to study possible toxic splashdowns of space debris

A global agency that sets rules for the seas is studying the… Continue reading

Online real estate auctions try to shake up sales with novel approach

An online auction for a luxury home in Abbotsford, B.C., is drawing… Continue reading

Most Read